Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /

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Language:English
Format: U.S. Federal Government Document Book E-Resource
id ocm23943489
ctrlnum (OCoLC)23943489
institution The University of Chicago
collection Hathi Collection
building Internet
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record_format hathi
spelling Parmeter, J. R.
Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation / John R. Parmeter, Jr., Robert F. Scharpf.
Berkeley, Calif. : U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, [1989]
5 p. ; 28 cm.
Research note PSW ; 406
Also available on the World Wide Web.
Caption title.
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
"June 1989."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 4-5).
Spread and buildup of dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobiun abietinum, was studied on inoculated white fir, Abies concolor, and red fir, A. magnifica, in northern Califomia for 23 to 28 years. At the end of these studies (1986), and in the absence of overstory infection, 13 of 23 trees had dwarf mistletoe populations that were the same or smaller than the original populations resulting from inoculation. Mortality of infections was the main factor limiting population increases. Live crown ratio of all trees averaged over 0.8. The average ratio of tree height growth to vertical spread rate of dwarf mistletoe was 11.5 to 1 in white fir and 7 to 1 in red fir in the Sierra Nevada. In the southem Cascades, the average ratio was 1.7 to 1 in red fir. About one fourth of the trees became infected in the bole. Of 14 additional trees infected by lateral spread of the parasite, 13 were within 6 m of the source of infection. Evidence continues to indicate that losses from dwarf mistletoes will be small in well-managed young fir stands free from infected overstory trees and properly spaced to promote good growth.
Dwarf mistletoes California.
Abies magnifica Diseases and pests California.
Abies concolor Diseases and pests California.
Scharpf, Robert F., 1931-
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
Research note PSW ; 406.
http://www.fs.fed.us/psw/publications/documents/psw_rn406/psw_rn406.pdf Connect to this title online.
language English
format U.S. Federal Government Document
Book
E-Resource
author Parmeter, J. R.
spellingShingle Parmeter, J. R.
Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
Research note PSW
Caption title.
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
"June 1989."
Spread and buildup of dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobiun abietinum, was studied on inoculated white fir, Abies concolor, and red fir, A. magnifica, in northern Califomia for 23 to 28 years. At the end of these studies (1986), and in the absence of overstory infection, 13 of 23 trees had dwarf mistletoe populations that were the same or smaller than the original populations resulting from inoculation. Mortality of infections was the main factor limiting population increases. Live crown ratio of all trees averaged over 0.8. The average ratio of tree height growth to vertical spread rate of dwarf mistletoe was 11.5 to 1 in white fir and 7 to 1 in red fir in the Sierra Nevada. In the southem Cascades, the average ratio was 1.7 to 1 in red fir. About one fourth of the trees became infected in the bole. Of 14 additional trees infected by lateral spread of the parasite, 13 were within 6 m of the source of infection. Evidence continues to indicate that losses from dwarf mistletoes will be small in well-managed young fir stands free from infected overstory trees and properly spaced to promote good growth.
Dwarf mistletoes California
Abies magnifica Diseases and pests California
Abies concolor Diseases and pests California
author_facet Parmeter, J. R.
Scharpf, Robert F., 1931-
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
Parmeter, J. R.
Scharpf, Robert F., 1931-
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
author2 Scharpf, Robert F., 1931-
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
author_browse Parmeter, J. R.
Scharpf, Robert F., 1931-
Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (Berkeley, Calif.)
author_sort Parmeter, J. R.
title Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_short Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_short_exact Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_full Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_fullStr Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_full_unstemmed Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_full_exact Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_author Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_author_exact Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_sort dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in california 23 to 28 years after inoculation
title_browse Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation /
title_browse_sort Dwarf mistletoe in red and white firs in California--23 to 28 years after inoculation
series Research note PSW
series2 Research note PSW 406
series_browse Research note PSW
series_facet Research note PSW
publisher U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Forest and Range Experiment Station,
publishDate 1989
publication_place Berkeley, Calif. :
physical 5 p. ; 28 cm.
contents Caption title.
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
"June 1989."
Spread and buildup of dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobiun abietinum, was studied on inoculated white fir, Abies concolor, and red fir, A. magnifica, in northern Califomia for 23 to 28 years. At the end of these studies (1986), and in the absence of overstory infection, 13 of 23 trees had dwarf mistletoe populations that were the same or smaller than the original populations resulting from inoculation. Mortality of infections was the main factor limiting population increases. Live crown ratio of all trees averaged over 0.8. The average ratio of tree height growth to vertical spread rate of dwarf mistletoe was 11.5 to 1 in white fir and 7 to 1 in red fir in the Sierra Nevada. In the southem Cascades, the average ratio was 1.7 to 1 in red fir. About one fourth of the trees became infected in the bole. Of 14 additional trees infected by lateral spread of the parasite, 13 were within 6 m of the source of infection. Evidence continues to indicate that losses from dwarf mistletoes will be small in well-managed young fir stands free from infected overstory trees and properly spaced to promote good growth.
topic Dwarf mistletoes California
Abies magnifica Diseases and pests California
Abies concolor Diseases and pests California
topic_browse Dwarf Mistletoes California
Abies Magnifica Diseases And Pests California
Abies Concolor Diseases And Pests California
notes Also available on the World Wide Web.
Caption title.
Distributed to depository libraries in microfiche.
"June 1989."
Includes bibliographical references (p. 4-5).
Spread and buildup of dwarf mistletoe, Arceuthobiun abietinum, was studied on inoculated white fir, Abies concolor, and red fir, A. magnifica, in northern Califomia for 23 to 28 years. At the end of these studies (1986), and in the absence of overstory infection, 13 of 23 trees had dwarf mistletoe populations that were the same or smaller than the original populations resulting from inoculation. Mortality of infections was the main factor limiting population increases. Live crown ratio of all trees averaged over 0.8. The average ratio of tree height growth to vertical spread rate of dwarf mistletoe was 11.5 to 1 in white fir and 7 to 1 in red fir in the Sierra Nevada. In the southem Cascades, the average ratio was 1.7 to 1 in red fir. About one fourth of the trees became infected in the bole. Of 14 additional trees infected by lateral spread of the parasite, 13 were within 6 m of the source of infection. Evidence continues to indicate that losses from dwarf mistletoes will be small in well-managed young fir stands free from infected overstory trees and properly spaced to promote good growth.
url http://www.fs.fed.us/psw/publications/documents/psw_rn406/psw_rn406.pdf
illustrated Not Illustrated
oclc_num 23943489
_version_ 1761661008119595008
import_time 2023-03-29T00:47:37.308Z