Shakespeare's nature : from cultivation to culture /

This book offers the first sustained account of the impact of the language and practice of husbandry on Shakespeare's work. It shows how the early modern discourse of cultivation changes attitude to the natural world, and traces the interrelationships between the human and the natural worlds in...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Scott, Charlotte.
Edition:1st ed.
Imprint:Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014.
Description:viii, 257 p. ; 23 cm.
Language:English
Subject:Shakespeare, William, -- 1564-1616 -- Knowledge -- Natural history.
Shakespeare, William, -- 1564-1616.
Nature in literature.
Agriculture in literature.
Agriculture in literature.
Nature in literature.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/9969423
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9780199685080 (hardback)
0199685088 (hardback)
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
Summary:This book offers the first sustained account of the impact of the language and practice of husbandry on Shakespeare's work. It shows how the early modern discourse of cultivation changes attitude to the natural world, and traces the interrelationships between the human and the natural worlds in Shakespeare's work through dramatic and poetic models of intervention, management, prudence and profit. Ranging from the Sonnets to 'The Tempest', the book explains how cultivation of the land responds to and reinforces social welfare, and reveals the extent to which the dominant industry of Shakespeare's time shaped a new language of social relations. Beginning with an examination of the rise in the production of early modern printed husbandry manuals, Shakespeare's Nature draws on the varied fields of economic, agrarian, humanist, Christian and literary studies, showing how the language of husbandry redefined Elizabethan attitudes to both the human and non-human worlds.
Table of Contents:
  • Introduction
  • The Sonnets, Early Modern Husbandry Manuals, and the Cultivation of Value
  • Henry V, Humanism, and Husbandry
  • Darkness Visible: Macbeth and the Poetics of the unnatural
  • Even better than the real thing? Art and Nature in The Winter's Tale
  • Prospero's Husbandry and the Cultivation of Anxiety
  • Conclusion