Bibliographic Details

A manual for writers of research papers, theses, and dissertations : Chicago Style for students and researchers / Kate L. Turabian ; revised by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory G. Colomb, Joseph M. Williams, and the University of Chicago Press editorial staff.

Author / Creator Turabian, Kate L.
Edition 8th edition.
Imprint Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, 2013.
©2013
Description xv, 448 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Language English
Series Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing
Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing.
Subject Dissertations, Academic -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Academic writing -- Handbooks, manuals, etc.
Academic writing.
Dissertations, Academic.
Handbooks and manuals.
Format Print, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/9045456
Related ItemsRelated title: Booth, Wayne C. 3rd ed. Chicago : University of Chicago Press, c2008. Craft of research.
Related title: 16th ed. Chicago : The University of Chicago Press, c2010. Chicago manual of style.
Other authors / contributors Booth, Wayne C.
Colomb, Gregory G.
Williams, Joseph M.
ISBN 9780226816371 (cloth : alkaline paper)
0226816370 (cloth : alkaline paper)
9780226816388 (paperback : alkaline paper)
0226816389 (paperback : alkaline paper)
9780226816395 (e-book)
Notes "Portions of this book have been adapted from The Craft of Research, 3rd edition, by Wayne C. Booth, Gregory C. Colomb, and Joseph M. Williams, ©1995, 2003, 2008 by The University of Chicago; and The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition, ©2010 by The University of Chicago"--title page verso.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Table of Contents:
  • A Note to Students
  • Preface
  • Part I. Research and Writing: From Planning to Production
  • Overview of Part I
  • 1. What Research Is and How Researchers Think about It
  • 1.1. How Researchers Think about Their Aims
  • 1.2. Three Kinds of Questions That Researchers Ask
  • 2. Moving from a Topic to a Question to a Working Hypothesis
  • 2.1. Find a Question in Your Topic
  • 2.2. Propose Some Working Answers
  • 2.3. Build a Storyboard to Plan and Guide Your Work
  • 2.4. Organize a Writing Support Group
  • 3. Finding Useful Sources
  • 3.1. Understand the Kinds of Sources Readers Expect You to Use
  • 3.2. Record Your Sources Fully, Accurately, and Appropriately
  • 3.3. Search for Sources Systematically
  • 3.4. Evaluate Sources for Relevance and Reliability
  • 3.5. Look beyond the Usual Kinds of References
  • 4. Engaging Sources
  • 4.1. Read Generously to Understand, Then Critically to Engage and Evaluate
  • 4.2. Take Notes Systematically
  • 4.3. Take Useful Notes
  • 4.4. Write as You Read
  • 4.5. Review Your Progress
  • 4.6. Manage Moments of Normal Panic
  • 5. Planning Your Argument
  • 5.1. What a Research Argument Is and Is Not
  • 5.2. Build Your Argument around Answers to Readers' Questions
  • 5.3. Turn Your Working Hypothesis into a Claim
  • 5.4. Assemble the Elements of Your Argument
  • 5.5. Distinguish Arguments Based on Evidence from Arguments Based on Warrants
  • 5.6. Assemble an Argument
  • 6. Planning a First Draft
  • 6.1. Avoid Unhelpful Plans
  • 6.2. Create a Plan That Meets Your Readers' Needs
  • 6.3. File Away Leftovers
  • 7. Drafting Your Report
  • 7.1. Draft in the Way That Feels Most Comfortable
  • 7.2. Develop Productive Drafting Habits
  • 7.3. Use Your Key Terms to Keep Yourself on Track
  • 7.4. Quote, Paraphrase, and Summarize Appropriately
  • 7.5. Integrate Quotations into Your Text
  • 7.6. Use Footnotes and Endnotes Judiciously
  • 7.7. Interpret Complex or Detailed Evidence Before You Offer It
  • 7.8. Be Open to Surprises
  • 7.9. Guard against Inadvertent Plagiarism
  • 7.10. Guard against Inappropriate Assistance
  • 7.11. Work Through Chronic Procrastination and Writer's Block
  • 8. Presenting Evidence in Tables and Figures
  • 8.1. Choose Verbal or Visual Representations
  • 8.2. Choose the Most Effective Graphic
  • 8.3. Design Tables and Figures
  • 8.4. Communicate Data Ethically
  • 9. Revising Your Draft
  • 9.1. Check for Blind Spots in Your Argument
  • 9.2. Check Your Introduction, Conclusion, and Claim
  • 9.3. Make Sure the Body of Your Report Is Coherent
  • 9.4. Check Your Paragraphs
  • 9.5. Let Your Draft Cool, Then Paraphrase It
  • 10. Writing Your Final Introduction and Conclusion
  • 10.1. Draft Your Final Introduction
  • 10.2. Draft Your Final Conclusion
  • 10.3. Write Your Title Last
  • 11. Revising Sentences
  • 11.1. Focus on the First Seven or Eight Words of a Sentence
  • 11.2. Diagnose What You Read
  • 11.3. Choose the Right Word
  • 11.4. Polish It Up
  • 11.5. Give It Up and Print It Out
  • 12. Learning from Your Returned Paper
  • 12.1. Find General Principles in Specific Comments
  • 12.2. Talk to Your Instructor
  • 13. Presenting Research in Alternative Forums
  • 13.1. Plan Your Oral Presentation
  • 13.2. Design Your Presentation to Be Listened To
  • 13.3. Plan Your Poster Presentation
  • 13.4. Plan Your Conference Proposal
  • 14. On the Spirit of Research
  • Part II. Source Citation
  • 15. General Introduction to Citation Practices
  • 15.1. Reasons for Citing Your Sources
  • 15.2. The Requirements of Citation
  • 15.3. Two Citation Styles
  • 15.4. Electronic Sources
  • 15.5. Preparation of Citations
  • 15.6. Citation Management Software
  • 16. Notes-Bibliography Style: The Basic Form
  • 16.1. Basic Patterns
  • 16.2. Bibliographies
  • 16.3. Notes
  • 16.4. Short Forms for Notes
  • 17. Notes-Bibliography Style: Citing Specific Types of Sources
  • 17.1. Books
  • 17.2. Journal Articles
  • 17.3. Magazine Articles
  • 17.4. Newspaper Articles
  • 17.5. Additional Types of Published Sources
  • 17.6. Unpublished Sources
  • 17.7. Websites, Blogs, Social Networks, and Discussion Groups
  • 17.8. Sources in the Visual and Performing Arts
  • 17.9. Public Documents
  • 17.10. One Source Quoted in Another
  • 18. Author-Date Style: The Basic Form
  • 18.1. Basic Patterns
  • 18.2. Reference Lists
  • 18.3. Parenthetical Citations
  • 19. Author-Date Style: Citing Specific Types of Sources
  • 19.1. Books
  • 19.2. Journal Articles
  • 19.3. Magazine Articles
  • 19.4. Newspaper Articles
  • 19.5. Additional Types of Published Sources
  • 19.6. Unpublished Sources
  • 19.7. Websites, Blogs, Social Networks, and Discussion Groups
  • 19.8. Sources in the Visual and Performing Arts
  • 19.9. Public Documents
  • 19.10. One Source Quoted in Another
  • Part III. Style
  • 20. Spelling
  • 20.1. Plurals
  • 20.2. Possessives
  • 20.3. Compounds and Words Formed with Prefixes
  • 20.4. Line Breaks
  • 21. Punctuation
  • 21.1. Periods
  • 21.2. Commas
  • 21.3. Semicolons
  • 21.4. Colons
  • 21.5. Question Marks
  • 21.6. Exclamation Points
  • 21.7. Hyphens and Dashes
  • 21.8. Parentheses and Brackets
  • 21.9. Slashes
  • 21.10. Quotation Marks
  • 21.11. Apostrophes
  • 21.12. Multiple Punctuation Marks
  • 22. Names, Special Terms, and Titles of Works
  • 22.1. Names
  • 22.2. Special Terms
  • 22.3. Titles of Works
  • 23. Numbers
  • 23.1. Words or Numerals?
  • 23.2. Plurals and Punctuation
  • 23.3. Date Systems
  • 23.4. Numbers Used outside the Text
  • 24. Abbreviations
  • 24.1. General Principles
  • 24.2. Names and Titles
  • 24.3. Geographical Terms
  • 24.4. Time and Dates
  • 24.5. Units of Measure
  • 24.6. The Bible and Other Sacred Works
  • 24.7. Abbreviations in Citations and Other Scholarly Contexts
  • 25. Quotations
  • 25.1. Quoting Accurately and Avoiding Plagiarism
  • 25.2. Incorporating Quotations into Your Text
  • 25.3. Modifying Quotations
  • 26. Tables and Figures
  • 26.1. General Issues
  • 26.2. Tables
  • 26.3. Figures
  • Appendix: Paper Format and Submission
  • A.1. General Format Requirements
  • A.2. Format Requirements for Specific Elements
  • A.3. File Preparation and Submission Requirements
  • Bibliography
  • Authors
  • Index