Temptation : a novel /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Kennedy, Douglas, 1955-
Edition:1st Atria pbk. ed.
Imprint:New York : Atria Paperback, 2012.
Description:298 p. ; 21 cm.
Language:English
Subject:
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8786415
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:1451602103
9781451602104
Summary:Charts the changing fortunes of Hollywood screenwriter David Armitage when he crosses paths with wealthy, eccentric, and controlling film buff Phil Fleck. After years of rejection, Davids loyal agent sells his television pilot for what becomes a runaway hit show. Despite his wife, Lucy, having given up her acting dreams and supported their small family during his lean years, the now successful David begins an affair with TV executive Sally Birmingham. Boorish financial adviser Bobby Barra introduces David to Phil, who likes toying with people. David's success, once a sure thing, suddenly becomes less certain.
Review by Booklist Review

Temptation, the seventh of Kennedy's backlist titles to be released in the U.S. in the last two years (following The Moment and State of the Union, both 2011), follows the fortunes of 41-year-old screenwriter David Armitage. After a decade of toiling in anonymity, David hits the big time when he sells a script to television that becomes an instant critical and commercial hit. He trades in his wheezing Volvo for a sleek new Porsche and his telemarketing wife for an ambitious young TV executive. David is finally living the life he has always dreamed about. Then a meeting with secretive billionaire and film buff Philip Fleck promises to make David much, much wealthier, but when their collaboration sours, David is hit with charges of plagiarism. Suddenly he is persona non grata, not only to his employer and various Hollywood players but also to his new girlfriend. Kennedy is a skillful and very entertaining writer, offering rich secondary characters in the way of David's loyal, down-to-earth agent and his sleazy but funny financial advisor. A page-turner with real emotional heft.--Wilkinson, Joanne Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

Kennedy's riveting new novel charts the changing fortunes of Hollywood screenwriter David Armitage when he crosses paths with wealthy, eccentric, and controlling film buff Phil Fleck. After years of rejection, David's loyal agent sells his television pilot for what becomes a runaway hit show. Despite his wife, Lucy, having given up her acting dreams and supported their small family during his lean years, the now successful David begins an affair with TV executive Sally Birmingham. Lucy responds by demanding a divorce and punishing him by limiting his contact with their daughter, Caitlin. Boorish financial adviser Bobby Barra introduces David to Phil, who likes toying with people and offers David $2.5 million for one of his unproduced screenplays. David, meanwhile, takes an interest in Phil's charming wife, Martha, and begins another affair. Though his good luck seems assured, David soon falls victim to a series of unfortunate events sparked by an accusation of plagiarism from vitriolic gossip columnist Theo McCall. Kennedy (Leaving the World) manages the tricky task of showing why David deserves his comeuppance, while simultaneously earning readers' sympathy. (Apr. 24) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by Library Journal Review

In this predictable "how the mighty have fallen" Hollywood morality tale, David Armitage is a struggling writer who has finally hit sitcom gold. He quickly succumbs to the excesses of fame, buying sports cars and replacing the wife who stood by his side with a younger model. His screenwriting success brings him to the attention of Philip Fleck, a ruthless billionaire who fancies himself a man of great artistic vision. Shortly after Fleck expresses an interest in developing one of Armitage's early scripts, David's career begins a downward spiral, and he becomes persona non grata in Tinseltown. Can he prove that Fleck is the one orchestrating his destruction? Will the silver screen take him back even if he can? Verdict The muted book jacket and inclusion of a reading group guide are very misleading-this book is much more Sidney Sheldon than Anita Shreve. Kennedy (The Moment; The Woman in the Fifth) has an excellent reputation abroad, but this Sunset Boulevard knockoff is unlikely to win him new readers. [See Prepub Alert, 5/23/11.]-Karen Kleckner Keefe, Hinsdale P.L., IL. (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Kirkus Book Review

Selling You (think Mad Men as half-hour comedy), has been sold to Fox by his doggedly persistent agent, Alison. All of a sudden he's a hot commodity with a hit series. Movie deals come out of the woodwork, as does money--soon David has a potty-mouthed but shrewd broker earning him pre-crash returns (this novel was originally published in 2006), and a Fox executive, Sally, showing more than professional interest. Besotted not only with Sally but with the Hollywood clout she represents, David leaves Lucy, gladly agreeing to hefty alimony and child support payments. Out of the blue, reclusive billionaire Philip Fleck invites David to his private island near Antigua to discuss making (and paying vast sums for) one of David's unproduced screenplays. While lolling on the island in luxury undreamt of by mere rich writers, David is distracted from wondering why his host has gone marlin-fishing by Fleck's wife Martha, who plies him with Stalin-era Stoly and almost seduces him. Fleck, seemingly oblivious to any hank-panky, finally appears to green-light the picture. To cement David's good fortune, the Emmy gods smile on Selling You. Then it all heads south. And that's when the real drama begins. The pages turn at such a blistering pace that readers will happily overlook the improbable plot.]] Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Copyright (c) Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.
Review by Booklist Review


Review by Publisher's Weekly Review


Review by Library Journal Review


Review by Kirkus Book Review