Understanding information transmission /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Anderson, John B., 1945-
Imprint:Piscataway, NJ : IEEE Press ; Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Interscience, c2005.
Description:1 online resource (viii, 311 p.) : ill.
Language:English
Series:Understanding science & technology series
Understanding science and technology series.
Subject:Signal theory (Telecommunication)
Signal theory (Telecommunication)
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8680142
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Johannesson, Rolf, 1946-
John Wiley & Sons.
ISBN:0471711209 (electronic bk.)
9780471711209 (electronic bk.)
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
Other form:Print version: Anderson, John B., 1945- Understanding information transmission. Piscataway, NJ : IEEE Press ; Hoboken, NJ : Wiley-Interscience, c2005 0471679100
Standard no.:10.1002/0471711209
Table of Contents:
  • 1. Introduction
  • First Ideas and Some History
  • 1.1. What is Communication?
  • 1.2. Why Digital Communication?
  • 1.3. Some History
  • 1.4. Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • 2. Mathematical Methods of Information Transmission
  • Why Sinusoids?
  • 2.1. Linear, Time-Invariant (LTI) Systems
  • 2.2. On the Importance of Being Sinusoidal
  • 2.3. The Fourier Transform
  • 2.4. What is Bandwidth?
  • 2.5. Discrete-time Systems
  • 2.6. Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Problems
  • 3. Information Sources
  • What is Out There to be Sent?
  • 3.1. What is Text?
  • 3.2. What is Speech?
  • 3.3. What is Music?
  • 3.4. What is an Image?
  • 3.5. What is Video?
  • 3.6. Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Problems
  • 4. Transmission Methods
  • How is Information Sent?
  • 4.1. Communication Channels
  • 4.2. Analog Modulation
  • 4.3. Digital Modulation
  • 4.4. FM Stereo, Television and a Little About Electronics
  • 4.5. Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Problems
  • 5. Information Theory and Cooling
  • What did Shannon Promise?
  • 5.1. Information Theory-a Primer
  • 5.2. Methods of Source Coding
  • 5.3. Methods of Channel Coding
  • 5.4. Trellis Coded Modulation
  • 5.5. Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Problems
  • 6. Cryptology
  • FubswrorjbÆ
  • 6.1. Fundamentals of Cryptosystems
  • 6.2. Caesar and Vigenère Ciphers
  • 6.3. The Vernam Cipher and Perfect Secrecy
  • 6.4. Stream Ciphers
  • 6.5. Block Ciphers
  • 6.6. Cryptomachines During World War II
  • 6.7. Two-key Cryptography
  • 6.8. Conclusion
  • Bibliography
  • Problems
  • 7. Communication Networks
  • Let's get Connected.
  • 7.1. An Overview of Information Networks
  • 7.2. Circuit Switching: The Telephone Net
  • 7.3. Mobile Telephony
  • 7.4. The Internet
  • Bibliography
  • Appendix A. Complex Numbers
  • Appendix B. Sinusoids and Circuit Theory
  • Appendix C. Probability Theory-a Primer
  • Index
  • About the Authors