Performance perspectives : a critical introduction /

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Basingstoke ; New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.
Description:xx, 244 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:English
Subject:Performance art -- Philosophy.
Performance art -- Study and teaching.
Performance artists -- Training of.
Performing arts -- Philosophy.
Performance art -- Study and teaching.
Performing arts -- Philosophy.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/8550627
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Pitches, Jonathan, 1968-
Popat, Sita.
Wallis, Mick.
ISBN:9780230243460 (pbk)
0230243460 (pbk)
9780230243453 (hbk)
0230243452 (hbk)
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (p. 207-218) and index.
Summary:This critical introduction to Performance Studies provides undergraduates with an accessible way into terminology and context. Using a tripartite structure that combines the voices of artists, critics and teachers, it addresses a variety of practices moving through body, space, time, technology, interactivity and organization.
Table of Contents:
  • List of Illustrations, Figures and Tables
  • Notes on Contributors
  • Performance perspectives
  • Foreword
  • Acknowledgements
  • Chapter 1. Introduction
  • Summary
  • Chapter summaries
  • Activities
  • Introduction
  • 2.1. Any body? The multiple bodies of the performer
  • The textual body
  • The lived body
  • The ecstatic (or fleshly) body
  • The unnatural body
  • The imagined body
  • Borth Bench
  • The recessive (or visceral) body
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 2. Body
  • 2.2. Some body and no body: the body of a performer
  • Some body
  • No body
  • A somebody or a nobody
  • The 'at risk' body
  • The ageing body
  • 2.3. Every body: performance's other bodies
  • Some bodies observed
  • The spectating body
  • The social body
  • The uncomfortable body
  • The absent body
  • The transformed body
  • The irreplaceable body
  • Activities
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 3. Space
  • Introduction
  • 3.1. Event-space: performance space and spatial performativity
  • Performing space
  • Event-space and spatial events
  • The end of illusion
  • The empty space
  • Disciplinary manoeuvres
  • Presencing architecture
  • 3.2. Scenographic space and place
  • 3.3. Audience space/scenographic space
  • Performance space and the audience
  • Performance place and scenographic space
  • The empty space and the performer
  • Activities
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 4. Time
  • Introduction
  • 4.1. Theatre, technology and time
  • Postmodern time
  • Extratemporality
  • Freezing time
  • Conclusion time
  • 4.2. Ghost Donce: time and duration in the work of Lone Twin
  • The unique connection between performance and time
  • Antony Gormley and the Fourth Plinth
  • Grasping time
  • Conclusion
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 5. Technology
  • Introduction
  • 5.1. Gaming and performance: narrative and identity
  • Computer games as drama
  • Self-representation and the avatar
  • Being there, doing that
  • The fourth wall
  • Conclusion
  • 5.2. Swan Quake: House - 'messing the system up'
  • SwanQuake: House: A personal experience (Sita Popat)
  • Interview with Ruth Gibson and Bruno Martelli
  • 5.3. Performance and technology: the myth of disembodiment
  • Introduction
  • Cyberspace
  • 'Touching with my eyes'
  • Liveness
  • Is any body out there?
  • Conclusion
  • Activities
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 6. Interactivity
  • Introduction
  • Two perspectives on interaction
  • 6.1. Boalian perspectives on interactivity in theatre
  • Introduction
  • The real and the fictional
  • What kinds of interactivity are there?
  • The need for closure and for support post-event
  • 4.3. The lives and times of performance
  • Activities
  • What does the audience contribute?
  • What are the challenges for the actors?
  • Conclusion
  • 6.3. Interactivity: functions and risks
  • Spaces of interactivity
  • 6.2. Interactivity and the work of Blast Theory
  • Interactivity and performance
  • Interactive performance is always incomplete
  • Interactivity in practice
  • Conclusion
  • Activities
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 7. Organization
  • Introduction
  • 7.1. Performance, culture, industry
  • Value, assets and returns
  • Communities of practice
  • Conclusion
  • 7.2. Organizational agility and improvisation
  • 7.3. Performance, organization, theory
  • The machine metaphor
  • Organization as organism
  • Organization as network
  • Activities
  • Further reading
  • Chapter 8. Epilogue
  • Bibliography
  • Index