The linguist as pedagogue : trends in the teaching and linguistic analysis of the Greek New Testament /

"This volume of important essays from recent Society of Biblical Literature annual meetings covers two related and vital topics - linguistic pedagogy and linguistic analysis. The essays on pedagogy discuss current trends and perspectives on how to approach the teaching of a dead language in the...

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Sheffield : Sheffield Phoenix Press, 2009.
Description:vi, 249 p. ; 23 cm.
Language:English
Series:New Testament monographs ; 11
New Testament monographs ; 11.
Subject:Bible. -- New Testament. -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Neues Testament
Bible. -- New Testament.
Linguistic analysis (Linguistics) -- Congresses.
Education -- Study and teaching -- Congresses.
Griechischunterricht
Sprachanalyse
Textanalyse
Education -- Study and teaching.
Linguistic analysis (Linguistics)
Conference papers and proceedings.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Format: E-Resource Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/7928981
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Porter, Stanley E., 1956-
O'Donnell, Matthew Brook.
ISBN:9781905048281 (hbk.)
1905048289 (hbk.)
Notes:"This collection of essays includes papers delivered over a significant span of time at a variety of Society of Biblical Literature conferences"--Pref.
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Summary:"This volume of important essays from recent Society of Biblical Literature annual meetings covers two related and vital topics - linguistic pedagogy and linguistic analysis. The essays on pedagogy discuss current trends and perspectives on how to approach the teaching of a dead language in the vibrancy of the electronic age. Experienced teacher-scholars give insights into how they draw upon linguistic theory and marshal technology to help reinforce pedagogical technique." "A second set of essays is concerned with the linguistic issue of 'prominence', asking, How are texts able to show that certain portions are more important than others? The essays, both theoretical and practical, grapple with the linguistic equivalent of underlining, to show how prominence helps authors make their point. The book of Hebrews, where identifying major themes and ideas have proved problematic, is offered as an extended example." "The volume is rounded off with a collection of papers applying the insights of modern linguistics, and particularly sociolinguistics and discourse analysis, to reading the New Testament in new and provocative ways that transcend traditional exegesis."--BOOK JACKET.