Slave revolts in antiquity /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Urbainczyk, Theresa, 1960-
Imprint:Berkeley : University of California Press, c2008.
Description:xii, 177 p. : map ; 22 cm.
Language:English
Subject:Slave insurrections -- Greece.
Slave insurrections -- Rome.
Slavery -- Greece.
Slavery -- Rome.
Slave insurrections.
Slavery.
Greece.
Rome (Empire)
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/7182743
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9780520257016 (cloth : alk. paper)
0520257014 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780520257023 (pbk. : alk. paper)
0520257022 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (p. 161-172) and index.
Review by Choice Review

Urbainczyk (Univ. College Dublin) examines the slave rebellions of Greco-Roman antiquity to argue that ancient writers thought slave uprisings were more significant than most contemporary historians generally credit them with being. According to Urbainczyk, "slaves in antiquity rebelled when they could, taking advantage of wars or other slave revolts to take up arms. What does not seem to have deterred them are previous revolts that resulted in death for the participants." Rather than describe the ancient practice of slavery or the conditions of slaves, she explores the significance of slave revolts, the extended nature of several revolts, the role of slave leaders such as Spartacus, and the ideology of slaves. Her analysis of the marginalized ancient historian Diodorus Siculus demonstrates that, far from being a mere copier of other sources, Siculus had his own ideas, including sympathy for the Sicilian slaves who revolted due to their harsh treatment. Urbainczyk assumes that readers are familiar with Keith Bradley's work, especially his Slavery and Rebellion in the Roman World (CH, May'90, 27-5268). A chronology at the outset of the book will aid readers when Urbainczyk's narrative shifts from Sicilian slaves to the Helots. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. T. J. Bond Washington State University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review