Yayoi AB80.

These 28 documents discuss the Yayoi who inhabited the Japanese archipelago from 2500 to 1500 B.P. Documents by Aikens and Higuchi, Hudson, and Pearson (Yayoi period) are general overviews. Eighteen selections from Ancient Japan (1992) are brief, illustrated discussions of a wide variety of artifact...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Imprint:New Haven, Conn. : Human Relations Area Files, 2004-
Language:English
Series:eHRAF archaeology. Asia
Subject:Yayoi culture -- Japan.
Antiquities.
Yayoi culture.
Japan -- Antiquities.
Japan.
Format: E-Resource Journal
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/7099985
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other uniform titles:Aikens, C. Melvin. Yayoi period.
Higuchi, Takayasu.
Barnes, Gina Lee. Spread of rice agriculture 1000 BC - AD 300.
Barnes, Gina Lee. Protohistoric Yamato.
Hanihara, Kazurō, 1927- Origin of the Japanese in relation to other ethnic groups in east Asia.
Howells, W. W. (William White), 1908- Physical anthropology of the prehistoric Japanese.
Hudson, Mark, 1963- From Toro to Yoshinogari.
Kondō, Yoshirō, 1925-2009 Keyhole tumulus and its relationship to earlier forms of burial.
Kanaseki, Hiroshi, 1927- Evidence of social change between the early and middle Yayoi.
Pearson, Richard J. Yayoi period.
Pearson, Richard J. Ancient Japan. Selections.
Tsukada, Matsuo. Vegetation in prehistoric Japan.
Other authors / contributors:Human Relations Area Files, inc.
Notes:Title from Web page (viewed Feb. 26, 2008).
This portion of eHRAF archaeology was released in 2004.
Includes bibliographical references.
Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Summary:These 28 documents discuss the Yayoi who inhabited the Japanese archipelago from 2500 to 1500 B.P. Documents by Aikens and Higuchi, Hudson, and Pearson (Yayoi period) are general overviews. Eighteen selections from Ancient Japan (1992) are brief, illustrated discussions of a wide variety of artifacts. Included with these selections from Ancient Japan is a bibliography by Pearson. Three documents include the Yayoi in long range studies. Through the use of genetic data, Kazuro traces the origins of the Japanese from 20,000 B.P. to the present day. Tsukada uses pollen studies to examine the history of Japanese vegetation during the same time period. In the third long range study, Howells compares skull measurement data from 9,000 B.P. to the present to trace relatedness between Asian peoples. In The spread of rice agriculture, Barnes examines the advance rice agriculture in Japan from 3000 to 1700 B.P.; and in Protohistoric Yamato uses settlement patterns to trace the rise of state society. Hiroshi describes early Yayoi ceramics and the Doigahama cemetery, and then extrapolates population data from cemetery data. Kondo Yoshiro discusses how burial mound evidence indicates a continuation of burial characteristics from the Kofun to the Yayoi period.