Bibliographic Details

Introduction to manuscript studies / Raymond Clemens and Timothy Graham.

Author / Creator Clemens, Raymond, 1966-
Imprint Ithaca : Cornell University Press, 2007.
Description xvi, 301 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), col. maps ; 31 cm.
Language English
Subject Manuscripts, Medieval.
Manuscripts, Latin (Medieval and modern)
Paleography, Latin.
Codicology.
Codicology.
Manuscripts, Latin (Medieval and modern)
Manuscripts, Medieval.
Paleography, Latin.
Format Print, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/6656830
Other authors / contributors Graham, Timothy.
ISBN 9780801438639 (cloth : alk. paper)
0801438632 (cloth : alk. paper)
9780801487088 (pbk. : alk. paper)
0801487080 (pbk. : alk. paper)
Notes Includes bibliographical references (p. 273-292) and index.
Review by Choice Review

In discussing medieval manuscripts, many authors try to balance art, history, literature, and technology, but tend to wax poetic or dissect the subject beyond recognition. Clemens (Illinois State) and Graham (New Mexico) have avoided such pitfalls and created a volume of broad interdisciplinary appeal. Part 1, "Making the Medieval Manuscript," outlines manuscript production's technical aspects, employing historic images and modern illustrations to demonstrate the creative process in exquisite detail. Part 2, "Reading the Medieval Manuscript," offers critical tools for reading manuscripts, including transcription, editing, and paleography of Latin works. Part 3 addresses genres most frequently encountered in medieval literature, including religious texts, charters, and maps. Although this volume would be an excellent classroom resource, it is not suited for reference collections. The exhaustive text is separated only nominally by chapter headings, making extraction of discrete information difficult. A brief index leaves researchers reading through large passages in search of specific material. Yet overall this beautifully illustrated, skillfully organized resource is an ideal survey of the field, valuable for presenting information critical to new students and veteran scholars, and for teaching the history and scope of the medieval manuscript. A very worthwhile addition to collections in medieval studies, art history, English literature, or archival studies. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-level undergraduates and above. L. R. Hudgins South Carolina Institute of Archaeology & Anthropology

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review