Bibliographic Details

Bromley's family law / N. V. Lowe, G. Douglas.

Author / Creator Lowe, N. V. (Nigel V.)
Edition 10th ed.
Imprint Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2007.
Description xciii, 1153 p. ; 25 cm.
Language English
Subject Domestic relations -- England.
Domestic relations -- Wales.
Domestic relations.
England.
Wales.
Format Print, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/6286854
Varying Form of Title Portion of title Family law
Other uniform titles Lowe, N. V. (Nigel V.). Family law.
Other authors / contributors Douglas, Gillian.
ISBN 9780406959515
040695951X
Notes Rev. ed. of: Family law. 9th ed. 1998.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
Table of Contents:
  • Preface
  • Table of statutes
  • Table of cases
  • 1. Introduction
  • A. The nature and scope of family law
  • 1. The meaning of 'family'
  • 2. The functions of family law
  • B. Trends in family law
  • 1. Equalisation of men and women
  • 2. Shift in emphasis from past fault to future needs
  • 3. Shift of attention from adults to children
  • 4. Growing recognition of cohabitation outside marriage and of same-sex partnerships
  • 5. Private ordering
  • 6. Multi-disciplinary and specialist approaches to family problems
  • C. The development of the family court system
  • 1. The current court system
  • 2. How the current system is used
  • 3. Increasing specialisation in family matters
  • 4. Transferring proceedings between courts
  • 5. Promoting liaison between courts
  • 6. Promoting the effectiveness of the family justice system
  • 7. Increased professionalism
  • 8. A more managerial approach
  • 9. Towards a Family Court?
  • D. The internationalisation of family law
  • 1. United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
  • 2. European Convention on Human Rights
  • 3. Other conventions and international instruments of influence
  • 2. Formation and Recognition of Adult Partnerships
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The right to marry
  • B. The nature of marriage
  • 1. Marriage as a contract
  • 2. Marriage as creating status
  • 3. Definition of marriage
  • 4. Civil partnership
  • C. Agreements to marry or form a civil partnership
  • 1. Continuing significance of engagements
  • 2. Civil partnership agreements
  • D. Entry into marriage
  • 1. Capacity to marry
  • 2. Formalities of marriage
  • E. Presumption of marriage
  • F. Establishing the validity of the marriage
  • 1. Declaration as to marital status
  • 2. Decree of nullity
  • 3. Grounds on which a marriage will be void
  • 4. Voidable marriages
  • 5. Effect of decree
  • 6. Is there a continuing need for nullity?
  • G. Entry into a civil partnership
  • 1. Capacity
  • 2. Formalities
  • H. Establishing the validity of a civil partnership
  • 1. Declaration
  • 2. Annulment of a civil partnership
  • I. Recognition of cohabitation
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Defining cohabitation
  • 3. A general definition?
  • 3. The Personal and Property Consequences of Marriage, Civil Partnership and Cohabitation
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The doctrine of unity
  • 2. Consortium
  • B. Personal consequences
  • C. Property consequences of relationships
  • 4. The Family Home
  • A. Introduction
  • B. Ownership
  • 1. The background to the current law
  • 2. The current law
  • 3. Reform
  • 4. Enforcing the trust
  • 5. Protection of beneficial interests
  • C. Occupation
  • 1. 'Home rights'
  • 2. Other forms of protected occupation
  • D. Insolvency and the family home
  • 1. Mortgages and charges
  • 2. Bankruptcy
  • E. Statutory protection of leasehold property
  • 1. The private sector
  • 2. Public sector tenancies
  • F. The position of the separated spouse or partner
  • 5. Domestic Violence
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. Historical developments
  • 2. Proposals for reform
  • B. Protection afforded by the criminal law
  • 1. Problems with the criminal justice system
  • 2. Protection from harassment
  • 3. Criminal injuries compensation
  • C. Civil law remedies
  • 1. The Family Law Act 1996 Part IV
  • 2. Protection from Harassment Act 1997
  • 3. Integrated domestic violence courts
  • 4. Injunctions in other civil proceedings
  • D. Remedies through housing law
  • 1. Actions in relation to tenancies
  • 2. Seeking help under the homelessness legislation
  • E. A criminal or civil matter?
  • 6. Divorce and Dissolution
  • A. Introduction
  • B. The Matrimonial Causes Act 1973
  • 1. Jurisdiction
  • 2. The substantive law
  • 3. The procedure for obtaining the divorce
  • 4. Reconciliation
  • 5. Mediation
  • 6. Collaborative law
  • C. Proposals for reform
  • 1. The Booth Committee on Matrimonial Causes Procedure
  • 2. The Law Commission's proposals
  • 3. The government's response
  • 4. Divorce under the Family Law Act 1996
  • 5. The pilot schemes and their outcomes
  • D. The aftermath of the 1996 Act and the future of divorce reform
  • E. Dissolution of civil partnership
  • F. Judicial separation and separation orders
  • 7. Parents and Children
  • A. Introduction
  • B. Who are the parents of a child?
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Techniques of human assisted reproduction
  • 3. Who is the legal mother?
  • 4. Who is the legal father?
  • 5. Parental orders
  • 6. Surrogacy agreements
  • C. Proof of parentage
  • 1. Mothers
  • 2. Fathers
  • 3. Declarations of parentage
  • 4. Registration of births
  • 5. Discovering genetic parentage
  • D. The legal significance of parentage
  • 1. Acquisition of British citizenship
  • 2. Leave to remain and settle in the United Kingdom
  • 3. Deportation
  • E. The meaning of 'child'
  • F. The meaning of 'child of the family'
  • G. The child's status
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The concept of legitimacy
  • 3. Declarations of status
  • 4. The significance of the child's status
  • 5. Should reference now be made to legitimacy and illegitimacy?
  • H. The changing nature of the parent-child relationship
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The initial strength of the father's position
  • 3. The strengthening of the mother's position
  • 4. The increasing recognition of the child's position
  • 8. Parental Responsibility
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. International acceptance of the concept of parental responsibility
  • 2. Contexts in which parental responsibility is relevant
  • B. The meaning and function of 'parental responsibility'
  • 1. The need to define parental responsibility
  • 2. Can there be a meaningful general definition?
  • 3. Further preliminary observations
  • 4. What parental responsibility comprises
  • 5. Liability for children's acts
  • 6. Liability for interference with parents' and children's rights
  • C. Who has parental responsibility
  • 1. The position at the child's birth
  • 2. Acquisition of parental responsibility subsequent to the child's birth
  • 3. Acquisition of parental responsibility by step-parents
  • 4. Acquisition of parental responsibility by other individuals
  • 5. Should the allocation of parental responsibility be further modified?
  • D. In respect of whom is there responsibility?
  • 1. The position with regard to unborn children
  • 2. The position with regard to embryos
  • E. Duration of parental responsibility
  • F. Sharing parental responsibility for a child
  • G. Effect of third parties acquiring parental responsibility
  • H. Delegation of parental responsibility
  • I. Caring for a child without having parental responsibility
  • 9. Guardianship
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The position of guardians before the Children Act 1989
  • 2. The need for reform
  • B. The current law
  • 1. Appointment of guardians
  • 2. Effect of being appointed a guardian
  • 3. Termination of guardianship
  • 4. Evaluating the current law
  • 10. The Welfare Principle
  • A. The paramountcy of the child's welfare
  • 1. The background to section 1(1)
  • 2. Is the paramountcy principle Human Rights compliant?
  • 3. Comparison with UN Convention
  • B. When the paramountcy principle applies
  • C. When the paramountcy principle does not apply
  • 1. The paramountcy principle does not apply outside the context of litigation
  • 2. The paramountcy principle does not apply to issues only indirectly concerning the child's upbringing
  • 3. The paramountcy principle does not apply if excluded by other statutory provisions
  • 4. Applying the paramountcy principle to more than one child
  • D. The meaning of welfare
  • 1. The checklist
  • 2. The contents of the 'list'
  • 3. When the checklist applies
  • E. Criticisms of the welfare principle
  • F. Delay prima facie prejudicial to the child's welfare
  • G. Orders to be made only where better than no order
  • 1. Introduction and background
  • 2. When section 1(5) applies
  • 3. Does section 1(5) create a burden of proof to show that a proposed order is for the child's benefit?
  • 4. Form of order
  • 5. The interrelationship of the paramountcy principle and section 1(5)
  • 11. The Voice of the Child
  • A. Introduction
  • B. The obligation to have regard to the child's views
  • 1. Domestic law
  • 2. International law
  • C. How children's views are investigated
  • 1. CAFCASS
  • 2. Welfare reports
  • 3. The role of the children's guardian
  • D. The child's direct participation in proceedings
  • 1. Private law proceedings
  • 2. Public law proceedings
  • E. Children as litigants
  • 1. The substantive law
  • 2. The procedure
  • F. The children's views and experiences of the family justice system
  • G. Looking after children's wider interests-the Commissioners for Children
  • 1. Background
  • 2. Overview of the English Commissioner's role
  • 12. The Court's Powers to Make Orders Under Part 11 of the Children Act 1989
  • A. Introduction
  • B. Section 8 orders
  • 1. The powers
  • 2. General restrictions on making section 8 orders
  • 3. Who may apply for section 8 orders?
  • 4. Effect of residence orders
  • 5. When section 8 orders can be made
  • 6. Enforcing section 8 orders
  • 7. Varying and discharging orders
  • 8. Appeals
  • C. Other powers
  • 1. Family assistance orders
  • 2. Section 37 directions
  • D. Deciding what orders, if any, to make
  • 1. Applying the principle under section 1(5)
  • 2. Applying the welfare principle
  • 3. Considerations when making contact orders
  • E. Enhanced residence orders
  • F. Special guardianship
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The power to make special guardianship orders
  • 3. Principles upon which orders are made
  • 4. Powers when making a special guardianship order
  • 5. The effects of special guardianship orders
  • 6. Variation and discharge
  • 7. Duration of order
  • 8. Special guardianship support services
  • 9. Commentary
  • 13. International Parental Child Abduction
  • A. Introduction
  • B. Preventing children from being abducted out of the United Kingdom
  • 1. Criminal sanctions
  • 2. Court prohibitions against removal
  • C. Dealing with children abducted to or brought from a 'non-Convention country' outside the United Kingdom
  • 1. Dealing with children abducted to a 'non-Convention country'
  • 2. Dealling with children abducted from a 'non-Convention country'
  • D. Dealing with children abducted to or brought from a 'Convention country'
  • 1. The relevant international instruments
  • 2. The strategy and aims of the international instruments
  • 3. The 1980 Hague Abduction Convention
  • 4. The revised Brussels II Regulation
  • 5. The European Custody Convention
  • 6. Evaluating the use and effect of the instruments
  • E. Dealing with children taken to or brought from another part of the United Kingdom and Isle of Man
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The Family Law Act 1986
  • 14. Children and Local Authorities
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The development of local authority powers
  • 2. The current law: some key underlying principles
  • B. Local authority support for children and families
  • 1. General duty to children in need
  • 2. Specific duties and powers
  • 3. Accommodating children in need
  • 4. Secure accommodation
  • C. Investigation of child abuse
  • D. Short-term protection
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Emergency protection orders
  • 3. Child assessment orders
  • 4. Police protection
  • E. Care and supervision proceedings
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Initiating proceedings
  • 3. The threshold criteria
  • 4. The welfare stage
  • 5. Some procedural and evidential issues
  • 6. Court orders
  • 7. Appeals
  • 8. Discharge of care orders and discharge and variation of supervision orders
  • F. Contact with children in care
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The scheme under section 34
  • G. Local authority duties towards 'looked after children'
  • H. Disputing local authority decisions
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The complaints procedure
  • 3. Default powers of the secretary of state
  • 4. Applying to the 'local government ombudsman'
  • 5. Wardship and the inherent jurisdiction
  • 6. Seeking leave to apply for a residence order
  • 7. Judicial review
  • 8. Habeas corpus
  • 9. Suing the local authority for negligence
  • 10. Suing the local authority for breach of human rights
  • 15. Adoption
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The nature of adoption and background to the 2002 legislation
  • 2. A comparison of adoption with other legal relationships and orders
  • 3. Adoption and human rights
  • 4. The changing pattern of adoption
  • 5. Responsibility for placing children for adoption
  • B. General principles when reaching decisions about adoption
  • 1. The weighting of the child's welfare
  • C. Adoption service
  • D. Placement for adoption
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The placement scheme under the 2002 Act
  • E. The making of adoption orders
  • 1. Who may be adopted
  • 2. Who may apply for adoption
  • 3. Consent to the making of an order
  • 4. Dispensing with consent
  • F. Procedure for the making of adoption orders
  • 1. The child must live with the applicants before the making of an order
  • 2. Notice to local authority must be given in non-agency placements
  • G. Functions and powers of the court
  • 1. Which court?
  • 2. Functions of the court
  • 3. The court's powers
  • H. Registration of adoption and the Adoption Contact Register
  • I. The effects of an adoption order
  • 1. Complete and permanent transfer of legal parentage
  • 2. The child's change of status
  • 3. Consequences of the change of status and transfer of parentage
  • J. Adoption with a foreign element
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. The 1993 Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption
  • 3. Overseas adoptions
  • 4. Domestic adoptions of foreign children
  • 5. Restrictions on bringing children into the United Kingdom for adoption
  • 6. Removing a child from the British Islands for adoption
  • K. Offences
  • 1. Illegal placements
  • 2. Illegal payments
  • 3. Advertisements
  • 16. The High Court's Inherent Powers in Respect of Children
  • A. Introduction
  • B. Wardship
  • 1. Historical development
  • 2. Characteristics of the wardship jurisdiction
  • 3. Who can be warded
  • 4. Invoking wardship
  • 5. The court's powers
  • 6. The principles on which the court acts
  • 7. The modern use of the jurisdiction
  • C. The inherent jurisdiction
  • 1. Jurisdiction and procedure
  • 2. The effect of invoking the inherent jurisdiction
  • 3. The court's powers
  • 4. Local authority use of the jurisdiction
  • 5. Individuals' use of the jurisdiction
  • D. Commentary
  • 17. Financial Support for Members of the Family
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. The duty to maintain a spouse or civil partner
  • 2. Parents' duty to maintain children of spouses or civil partners
  • 3. Support obligations outside marriage or civil partnership
  • 4. Enforcement of the duty to maintain
  • B. State support
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Support through tax credits
  • 3. Social security benefits
  • 4. Child benefit
  • 5. Child trust funds
  • C. Maintenance under the Child Support Act 1991
  • 1. Background
  • 2. The scheme of the Act
  • 3. The residual role of the courts
  • 4. Evaluation of the child support scheme
  • D. Private agreements
  • 1. Between spouses and civil partners
  • 2. Between parents
  • E. The courts' Jurisdiction to make orders for financial support
  • 1. Orders for spouses or civil partners
  • 2. Obtaining financial relief for children
  • 3. Enforcement of orders
  • 18. Financial Relief on Divorce, Dissolution, Nullity and Separation
  • A. Introduction
  • 1. Development of the court's powers
  • 2. Powers of the court
  • 3. Application for relief
  • 4. Ancillary relief procedure
  • B. Orders that may be made
  • 1. Maintenance pending suit
  • 2. Periodical payments
  • 3. Lump sum payments
  • 4. Orders in relation to pensions
  • 5. Transfer and settlement of property
  • 6. Variation of marriage settlements
  • 7. Orders for the sale of property
  • 8. Consent orders
  • 9. The Legal Services Commission's statutory charge
  • 10. The limits of the court's powers
  • C. Assessment of financial provision
  • 1. General principles
  • 2. Factors to be taken into account when assessing what orders should be made for a spouse
  • 3. The matrimonial home
  • 4. Costs awards
  • 5. Appeals
  • D. Variation, discharge, suspension and revival of orders
  • 1. Orders that may be varied
  • 2. Factors to be taken into consideration
  • 3. Variation of consent orders
  • 4. Appealing out of time
  • E. Enforcement of orders
  • 1. Methods of enforcement
  • 2. Attempts to defeat claims for financial relief
  • 3. Registration of orders in other courts
  • F. Financial relief after foreign divorce, dissolution, annulment or legal separation
  • 1. Background to the legislation
  • 2. When relief maybe sought
  • 3. Applicants are required to obtain leave
  • 4. Applying for an order
  • 5. Orders that may be made
  • G. Reform
  • H. Comparable provisions under the two Acts
  • 19. The Legal Consequences of a Death in the Family
  • A. Presumption of death
  • B. Succession
  • 1. Testate succession
  • 2. Intestate succession
  • C. The statutory transmission of tenancies
  • 1. The private sector
  • 2. Regulated tenancies under the Rent Act 1977
  • 3. Assured tenancies
  • 4. Secure tenancies
  • D. Provision for members of the family and other dependants
  • 1. Who may apply for an order
  • 2. Reasonable provision
  • 3. Factors to be taken into account
  • 4. Property available for financial provision
  • 5. Orders that may be made
  • 6. Relationship to existing agreements and orders
  • E. Compensation under the Fatal Accidents Act
  • 1. Background
  • 2. Who may claim
  • 3. Against whom the action may be brought
  • 4. Assessment of damages
  • 5. Reform of the legislation
  • Index