The art of scientific writing : from student reports to professional publications in chemistry and related fields /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Ebel, Hans Friedrich.
Edition:2nd, completely rev. ed.
Imprint:Weinheim : Wiley-VCH, c2004.
Description:xii, 595 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Language:English
Subject:Chemistry -- Authorship.
Technical writing.
Chemistry -- Authorship.
Technical writing.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/5146287
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Bliefert, Claus.
Russey, William E.
ISBN:3527298290 (acid-free paper)
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (p. [554]-559) and index.
Table of Contents:
  • I. Goals and Forms in Scientific Writing
  • 1. Reports
  • 1.1. The Scientist as Writer
  • 1.1.1. Communication in the Natural Sciences
  • 1.1.2. The Maintenance of Quality in Science
  • 1.2. The Purpose and Significance of a Scientific "Report"
  • 1.3. The Laboratory Notebook
  • 1.3.1. The Role and Form of a Scientist's Notebook
  • 1.3.2. Content
  • Heading and Introduction
  • The Experimental Section
  • A Scientist's Ethical Responsibilities
  • 1.3.3. Organizational Matters
  • What is an Experiment?
  • Experiment Numbers
  • 1.4. From Laboratory Notebook Entries to a Formal Report
  • 1.4.1. Describing an Experiment
  • 1.4.2. The Preparation of a Formal Report
  • Proposed Subdivisions: An Outline
  • Drafting the Text
  • First Refinements: Perfecting the Language
  • Suggestions Related to Writing Style
  • Subsequent Drafts
  • Finished Copy
  • 1.5. Various Types of Reports
  • 1.5.1. The Academic Environment: Laboratory Reports, Grant Proposals, and the Like
  • 1.5.2. The Corporate Environment: Technical Documentation
  • 1.5.3. Commissioned Reports
  • 2. Dissertations
  • 2.1. Nature and Purpose
  • 2.2. The Components of a Dissertation
  • 2.2.1. Overview
  • 2.2.2. Title and Title Page
  • 2.2.3. Abstract
  • 2.2.4. Preface
  • 2.2.5. Table of Contents; Section Headings
  • Basic Considerations
  • Headings and Hierarchical Structure
  • Structure and Form; Decimal Classification
  • 2.2.6. Introduction
  • 2.2.7. Results
  • 2.2.8. Discussion
  • 2.2.9. Conclusions
  • 2.2.10. Experimental Section
  • 2.2.11. References Section and Miscellaneous Component
  • 2.3. Preparing the Dissertation
  • 2.3.1. From Outline to Final Draft
  • Developing a Concept
  • Writing Techniques
  • 2.3.2. The Final Product: A First-Rate Doctoral Dissertation
  • 2.3.3. The "Electronic Dissertation"
  • 2.3.4. Last Steps on the Road Toward Acquiring Your Degree
  • 3. Journal Articles
  • 3.1. The Scholarly Journal as a Medium of Communication
  • 3.1.1. "Publication" as a Concept
  • 3.1.2. "Electronic Publication": Its Nature as Defined by Early Manifestations
  • The Beginnings
  • The Prototype E-Journal: Current Clinical Trials
  • Further Ramifications of the Digital Revolution
  • Questions of "Permanence"
  • The Road Ahead
  • Effective and Efficient Acquisition of Information
  • The Quest for Knowledge
  • 3.1.3. More from the World of Tomorrow (or Today!)
  • Professional vs. Private Publication
  • The Scene Today
  • The Current State of the Electronic "Environment"
  • Information Acquisition Today: Search Capabilities
  • "Markup" of an Electronic Document
  • Authors and Authorship in the Twenty-First Century
  • 3.1.4. The Various Types of Journals
  • 3.2. Decisions Prior to Publication
  • 3.2.1. Publish When?
  • 3.2.2. Publish What, and With Whom?
  • 3.2.3. Publish In What Form?
  • 3.2.4. Publish Where?
  • 3.3. The Components of a Journal Article
  • 3.3.1. General Observations; Title and Authorship
  • 3.3.2. Abstract
  • 3.3.3. The Actual Article
  • 3.4. Preparing the Manuscript
  • 3.4.1. Text
  • Introduction
  • Matters of Form
  • 3.4.2. Formulas and Equations
  • 3.4.3. Figures
  • A Figure or a Table?
  • The Processing of Figures
  • Relating Figures to the Accompanying Text
  • Miscellaneous Matters
  • 3.4.4. Tables
  • 3.4.5. Footnotes and Other "Interjections"
  • 3.4.6. Special Considerations Applicable to Direct Reproduction
  • 3.5. From Manuscript to Publication
  • 3.5.1. Publishers and Editors
  • Publishing Houses
  • Editors and Editing
  • 3.5.2. Submitting the Manuscript
  • 3.5.3. Manuscript Review
  • 3.5.4. Editing, Typesetting, and Page Proofs
  • 3.5.5. Proofreading
  • The Art of Proofreading
  • Marking the Mistakes
  • 4. Books
  • 4.1. Preliminary Thoughts
  • 4.1.1. What Is a Book?
  • 4.1.2. Where Do Books Come From?
  • 4.1.3. What Are Books For?
  • 4.1.4. Collaborating With a Publishing House
  • 4.2. Planning and Preparation
  • 4.2.1. First Drafts of the Title, Outline, and Preface
  • 4.2.2. Sample Chapter
  • 4.3. Developing the Manuscript
  • 4.3.1. Organizational Considerations
  • 4.3.2. Assembling the Background Literature
  • 4.3.3. The Structure of the Book
  • 4.3.4. Developing the Content
  • First Draft
  • The "Special Features"
  • Revision
  • 4.3.5. Final Copy
  • Text
  • Other Elements
  • 4.4. Typesetting and Printing
  • 4.4.1. Processing the Manuscript
  • 4.4.2. Page-Proof and Galley-Proof Correction
  • 4.5. Final Steps
  • 4.5.1. Index Preparation
  • 4.5.2. Title Pages
  • 4.5.3. Binding
  • II. Materials, Tools, and Methods in Scientific Writing
  • 5. Writing Techniques
  • 5.1. Introduction
  • 5.2. Word Processing and Page Layout
  • 5.2.1. Hardware and Operating Systems
  • The Personal Computer
  • Keyboards
  • Miscellaneous Peripheral Components
  • Printers
  • 5.2.2. Word-Processing and Page-Layout Software
  • 5.3. Writing and Formatting with a Computer
  • 5.3.1. Becoming Accustomed to Your System
  • The Basics
  • Mouse Techniques
  • Windows and Toolbars
  • Text-Window Properties
  • Marking (Highlighting)
  • Formatting
  • Customization
  • 5.3.2. The Utilization of Word-Processing Software
  • A Writer's Dream Come True
  • The Benefits Conferred by Word Processing
  • 5.3.3. Advanced Aspects of Text Editing
  • Formats, Patterns, Styles, and Templates
  • Character Sets
  • "Styles"
  • AutoText Entries
  • Subdivisions
  • Anticipating the Need for an Index
  • Spell Checking
  • Search Operations
  • Editing Functions
  • 5.4. Digital Data and Electronic Publishing
  • 5.4.1. The Digital or Electronic Manuscript
  • Basic Considerations
  • File Formats
  • Structured Markup Systems
  • Special Considerations Applicable to Electronic Manuscripts that Require Typesetting
  • 5.4.2. Electronic Editing
  • Desktop Publishing
  • Strategic Considerations
  • 5.5. General Formatting Guidelines
  • 5.5.1. Text
  • Fonts and Units of Measure in Typography
  • Specific Type Fonts and Document Formats
  • Manuscript Style and Markup
  • Headings, Paragraphs, Equations, and Lists
  • Footnotes
  • 5.5.2. Preparation of Final Copy
  • 6. Formulas
  • 6.1. Quantities
  • 6.1.1. Quantities and Dimensions
  • 6.1.2. Derived Quantities and Functions
  • 6.1.3. More Regarding Symbols and Their Representation
  • 6.1.4. Quantitative Expressions
  • 6.2. SI Units
  • 6.2.1. Base Units and Derived Units
  • 6.2.2. Derived Units and "Supplementary" Units
  • 6.2.3. Prefixes, Decimal Points, and Other Stylistic Matters
  • 6.3. Special Units in Chemistry
  • 6.3.1. "Amount of Substance" and the Mole
  • 6.3.2. Molar Quantities and Mixtures of Substances
  • 6.4. Numbers and Numerical Data
  • 6.5. Working with Formulas and Equations
  • 6.5.1. Combining Text with Equations
  • 6.5.2. "Stacked" Expressions and "Fragmented" Formulas
  • 6.5.3. Indices
  • 6.5.4. Frequently Encountered Special Symbols
  • 6.5.5. Additional Rules for Writing Formulas
  • 6.5.6. Spacing
  • 6.6. Programmed Typesetting of Formulas
  • 6.6.1. LaTex as a Formula Generator
  • 6.6.2. LaTex and Text
  • 6.7. MathType and MathML
  • 7. Figures
  • 7.1. General Considerations
  • 7.1.1. Figures and Figure Numbers
  • 7.1.2. Figure Captions
  • Figure Identifiers and Titles
  • Legends
  • Miscellaneous Technical Observations
  • Legal Matters: The Citation of Figures
  • 7.2. Line Art
  • 7.2.1. What Is Line Art?
  • 7.2.2. The Preparation of Line Drawings
  • Useful Equipment
  • The Fundamentals
  • 7.2.3. Coordinate Diagrams
  • Graphic Presentations Based on a Set of Coordinate Axes
  • Technical Considerations
  • Scaling
  • Axis Labels
  • 7.2.4. Schematic Drawings and Graphs of Miscellaneous Types
  • 7.2.5. Structural Formulas in Chemistry
  • 7.3. Drawing With a Computer
  • 7.3.1. Overview, and an Introduction to Vector Graphics
  • 7.3.2. Miscellaneous Observations
  • 7.4. Halftones
  • 7.5. Overview of Software Useful in Editing Figures, both Line Drawings and Vector Graphics
  • 8. Tables
  • 8.1. The Logic Behind a Table
  • 8.2. The Significance of a Table
  • 8.3. The Form of a Table
  • 8.4. The Components of a Table
  • 8.4.1. Table Title
  • 8.4.2. Table Heading
  • Simple Table Heads
  • Working with Units
  • Structured Table Headings
  • 8.4.3. Table Content
  • 8.4.4. Table Footnotes
  • 8.5. Worksheets, Lists, and Databases
  • 8.5.1. Spreadsheets and Worksheets
  • 8.5.2. Databases
  • 9. Collecting and Citing the Literature
  • 9.1. The Acquisition of Information
  • 9.1.1. Reading and Evaluating the Professional Literature
  • 9.1.2. Effective Use of a Specialized Library
  • "Classical" Resources
  • The Organization of a Library
  • The Library of the Twenty-First Century
  • 9.2. Building One's Own Literature Collection
  • 9.2.1. An Author Catalogue
  • 9.2.2. The Computer-Supported Literature Collection
  • 9.3. Citation Techniques
  • 9.3.1. Citing and Citations
  • 9.3.2. The Numerical System
  • 9.3.3. The Name-Date System
  • 9.3.4. A Comparison of the Two Systems
  • 9.4. The Form of a Citation
  • 9.4.1. Standards of Quality
  • 9.4.2. Standardization in Citation Practice
  • Background
  • The Vancouver Convention
  • The Current Outlook
  • 9.5. Anatomy of a Source Description
  • 9.5.1. General Characteristics
  • 9.5.2. Sources of Various Types
  • Books and Journals
  • Miscellaneous Documents and Sources
  • Appendices
  • A. Reference Formats
  • B. Selected Quantities, Units, and Constants
  • C. The 20 Commandments of Electronic Manuscripts
  • D. Conversion Tips
  • D.1. Conversions Between the Macintosh and Windows Worlds
  • D.2. File Conversions Involving Two Different Layout Programs
  • Literature
  • Index