Bibliographic Details

Youth, pornography and the Internet / Dick Thornburgh and Herbert S. Lin, editors, Committee to Study Tools and Strategies for Protecting Kids from Pornography and Their Applicability to Other Ianappropriate Internet Content, Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, National Research Council.

Imprint Washington, D.C. : National Academy Press, c2002.
Description xxviii, 450 p. ; 23 cm.
Language English
Subject Internet and teenagers.
Internet -- Security measures.
Internet pornography.
Parenting.
Internet and children.
Internet and teenagers.
Internet pornography.
Internet -- Security measures.
Parenting.
Format Print, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/4697690
Other authors / contributors Thornburgh, Dick.
Lin, Herbert.
National Research Council (U.S.). Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. Committee to Study Tools and Strategies for Protecting Kids from Pornography and Their Applicability to Other Inappropriate Internet Content.
ISBN 0309082749
Notes Includes bibliographical references and index.
Table of Contents:
  • Executive Summary
  • Part I.
  • 1. Introduction
  • 1.1. The Internet: Source of Promise, Source of Concern
  • 1.2. A Critical Definitional Issue--What Is "Pornography"?
  • 1.3. Other Types of Inappropriate Material and Experiences
  • 1.4. A Broad Spectrum of Opinion and Views
  • 1.5. Focus and Structure of This Report
  • 2. Technology
  • 2.1. An Orientation to Cyberspace and the Internet
  • 2.1.1. Characteristics of Digital Information
  • 2.1.2. The Nature of the Internet Medium and a Comparison to Other Media Types
  • 2.1.3. Internet Access Devices
  • 2.1.4. Connecting to the Internet
  • 2.1.5. Identifying Devices on the Internet: The Role of Addressing
  • 2.1.6. Functionality of the Internet
  • 2.1.7. Cost and Economics of the Internet
  • 2.1.8. A Global Internet
  • 2.1.9. The Relative Newness of the Internet
  • 2.2. Technologies of Information Retrieval
  • 2.3. Technologies Related to Access Control and Policy Enforcement
  • 2.3.1. Filtering Technologies
  • 2.3.2. Technologies for Authentication and Age Verification
  • 2.3.3. Encryption (and End-to-End Opacity)
  • 2.3.4. Anonymizers
  • 2.3.5. Location Verification
  • 2.4. What the Future May Bring
  • 3. The Adult Online Entertainment Industry
  • 3.1. The Structure and Scale of the Online Adult Entertainment Industry
  • 3.2. The Generation of Revenue
  • 3.3. Practices Related to Minors
  • 3.4. What the Future May Hold
  • 3.4.1. The Structural Evolution of the Industry
  • 3.4.2. Increased Regulation
  • 3.4.3. Future Products and Services
  • 3.5. Industry Structure, Product Differentiation, and Aggressive Promotion
  • 4. Legal and Regulatory Issues
  • 4.1. The First Amendment
  • 4.1.1. First Principles
  • 4.1.2. The First Amendment, Pornography, and Obscenity
  • 4.1.3. The First Amendment and Protecting Children from Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material
  • 4.1.4. The First Amendment Rights of Minors
  • 4.1.5. The First Amendment and Child Pornography
  • 4.1.6. The First Amendment in Public Libraries
  • 4.1.7. The First Amendment in Public Schools
  • 4.1.8. The First Amendment and the Commercial Advertising of Sexually Explicit Material
  • 4.2. Relevant Statutes and Common Law
  • 4.2.1. Federal Obscenity Statutes
  • 4.2.2. Child Pornography Statutes
  • 4.2.3. The Communications Decency Act
  • 4.2.4. The Child Online Protection Act
  • 4.2.5. The Children's Internet Protection Act
  • 4.2.6. The Children's Online Privacy Protection Act
  • 4.2.7. State Statutes
  • 4.2.8. Regulatory Efforts
  • 4.2.9. International Dimensions
  • 4.3. Law Enforcement, Training, and Education
  • 5. Children, Media, and Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material
  • 5.1. Children and How They Use Media
  • 5.2. Sexuality in Culture
  • 5.3. The Role of Media in Providing Information on Sexuality to Youth
  • 5.4. Dimensions of Exposure and Access to the Internet
  • 5.4.1. Venues of Access
  • 5.4.2. Sources and Channels of Exposure
  • 5.4.3. Extent of Exposure
  • 5.5. Internet Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material, Solicitations, and Harassment
  • 5.5.1. Deliberate Search for Sexually Explicit Material
  • 5.5.2. Inadvertent Exposure to or Intrusion of Sexually Explicit Material
  • 5.5.3. Sexual Solicitations and Approaches
  • 5.5.4. Harassment
  • 6. The Research Base on the Impact of Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material: What Theory and Empirical Studies Offer
  • 6.1. Theoretical Considerations
  • 6.2. Empirical Work
  • 6.2.1. Violence
  • 6.2.2. Sexually Violent Material
  • 6.2.3. Exposure to Non-violent Sexual Material
  • 6.2.4. Caveats and Cautions
  • 6.3. Factors Affecting the Impact on Minors of Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material
  • 6.3.1. Impact
  • 6.3.2. Minors
  • 6.3.3. Gender
  • 6.3.4. Special Needs
  • 6.3.5. Exposure
  • 6.3.6. The Type of Sexually Explicit Material
  • 7. Beyond the Science: Perspectives on Impact and the Public Debate
  • 7.1. Challenges to Parents
  • 7.2. Speculations and Other Perspectives on Possible Impact
  • 7.3. Rhetorical Concerns and Issues of Public Debate
  • 7.4. Judgments in the Absence of a Reliable Research Base
  • 7.5. Concluding Observations
  • Part II.
  • 8. Approaches to Protection From Inappropriate Material
  • 8.1. The Identification of Inappropriate Material
  • 8.1.1. In Principle
  • 8.1.2. In Practice
  • 8.2. Dimensions of "Protection"
  • 8.3. The Time Line of Protective Actions
  • 8.4. Differing Institutional Missions of Schools and Libraries
  • 8.5. The Politics of Protection and Inappropriate Material--Who and When?
  • 8.6. Techniques of Protection
  • 8.7. Approaches to Protection
  • 9. Legal and Regulatory Tools
  • 9.1. Vigorous Prosecutions of Obscene Material
  • 9.2. Civil Liability for Presenting Obscene Material on the Internet
  • 9.3. Options for Dealing with Material That Is Obscene for Minors
  • 9.3.1. Age Verification
  • 9.3.2. Plain Brown Wrappers and Age Verification
  • 9.3.3. Labeling of Material That Is Obscene for Minors
  • 9.3.4. Prohibiting Spam That Is Obscene for Minors
  • 9.3.5. Prohibiting the Practice of Mousetrapping to Web Sites Containing Material That Is Obscene for Minors
  • 9.4. Enforcement of Record-Keeping Requirements
  • 9.5. Streamlining the Process of Handling Violation
  • 9.6. Self-Regulatory Approaches
  • 9.7. General Observations
  • 10. Social and Educational Strategies to Develop Personal and Community Responsibility
  • 10.1. Foundations of Responsible Choice
  • 10.2. Definition of a Social or Educational Strategy
  • 10.3. Contextual Issues for Social and Educational Strategies
  • 10.4. Parental Involvement and Supervision
  • 10.5. Peer Assistance
  • 10.6. Acceptable Use Policies
  • 10.7. After-the-Fact Strategies
  • 10.8. Education
  • 10.8.1. Internet Safety Education
  • 10.8.2. Information and Media Literacy
  • 10.8.3. Collateral Issues
  • 10.9. Compelling and Safe Content
  • 10.10. Public Service Announcements and Media Campaigns
  • 10.11. Findings and Observations About Social and Educational Strategies
  • 11. A Perspective on Technology-Based Tools
  • 11.1. Technology-Based Tools
  • 11.2. Contextual Issues for Technology-Based Tools
  • 11.3. The Questions to Be Asked of Each Tool
  • 12. Technology-Based Tools for Users
  • 12.1. Filtering and Content-Limited Access
  • 12.1.1. What Is Filtering and Content-Limited Access?
  • 12.1.2. How Well Does Filtering Work?
  • 12.1.3. Who Decides What Is Inappropriate?
  • 12.1.4. How Flexible and Usable Is the Product?
  • 12.1.5. What Are the Costs of and the Infrastructure Required for Filtering?
  • 12.1.6. What Does the Future Hold for Filtering?
  • 12.1.7. What Are the Implications of Filtering Use?
  • 12.1.8. Findings on Filters
  • 12.2. Monitoring
  • 12.2.1. What Is Monitoring?
  • 12.2.2. How Well Does Monitoring Work?
  • 12.2.3. Who Decides What Is Inappropriate?
  • 12.2.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Products for Monitoring?
  • 12.2.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for Monitoring?
  • 12.2.6. What Does the Future Hold for Monitoring?
  • 12.2.7. What Are the Implications of Using Monitoring?
  • 12.2.8. Findings on Monitoring
  • 12.3. Tools for Controlling or Limiting "Spam"
  • 12.3.1. What Are Technologies for Controlling Spam?
  • 12.3.2. How Well Do Spam-Controlling Technologies Work?
  • 12.3.3. Who Decides What Is Spam?
  • 12.3.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Products for Controlling Spam?
  • 12.3.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for Using Spam-Control Products?
  • 12.3.6. What Does the Future Hold for Spam-Controlling Systems?
  • 12.3.7. What are the Implications of Using Spam-Controlling Systems?
  • 12.3.8. Findings on Spam-Controlling Technologies
  • 12.4. Instant Help
  • 12.4.1. What Is Instant Help?
  • 12.4.2. How Well Might Instant Help Work?
  • 12.4.3. Who Decides What Is Inappropriate?
  • 12.4.4. How Flexible and Usable Is Instant Help?
  • 12.4.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for Instant Help?
  • 12.4.6. What Does the Future Hold for Instant Help?
  • 12.4.7. What Are the Implications of Using Instant Help?
  • 12.4.8. Findings on Instant Help
  • 13. Technology-Based Tools Available to Non-End Users
  • 13.1. A .xxx Top-Level Domain
  • 13.1.1. What Is a .xxx Top-level Domain?
  • 13.1.2. How Well Would a .xxx Top-Level Domain Work?
  • 13.1.3. Who Decides What Material Should Be Confined to .xxx Web Sites?
  • 13.1.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Schemes Based on a .xxx Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.1.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for a .xxx Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.1.6. What Does the Future Hold for a .xxx Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.1.7. What Are the Implications of Using a .xxx Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.1.8. Findings on a .xxx Top-Level Domain
  • 13.2. A .kids Top-Level Domain
  • 13.2.1. What is a .kids Top-level Domain?
  • 13.2.2. How Well Would a .kids Top-Level Domain Work?
  • 13.2.3. Who Decides What Material Should Be Allowed in .kids Web Sites?
  • 13.2.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Schemes Based on a .kids Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.2.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for a .kids Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.2.6. What Does the Future Hold for a .kids Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.2.7. What Are the Implications of Using a .kids Top-Level Domain?
  • 13.2.8. Findings on a .kids Top-Level Domain
  • 13.3. Age Verification Technologies
  • 13.3.1. What Are Age Verification Technologies?
  • 13.3.2. How Well Do Age Verification Technologies Work?
  • 13.3.3. Who Decides What Is Inappropriate?
  • 13.3.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Products for Verifying Age?
  • 13.3.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for Age Verification?
  • 13.3.6. What Does the Future Hold for Age Verification Systems?
  • 13.3.7. What Are the Implications of Using Age Verification Systems?
  • 13.3.8. Findings on Age Verification Technologies
  • 13.4. Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property
  • 13.4.1. What Are Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property?
  • 13.4.2. How Well Do Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property Work?
  • 13.4.3. Who Decides What Is Inappropriate?
  • 13.4.4. How Flexible and Usable Are Products for Protecting Intellectual Property?
  • 13.4.5. What Are the Costs and Infrastructure Required for Protecting Intellectual Property?
  • 13.4.6. What Does the Future Hold for Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property?
  • 13.4.7. What Are the Implications of Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property?
  • 13.4.8. Findings on Tools for Protecting Intellectual Property
  • Part III.
  • 14. Findings, Conclusions, and Future Needs
  • 14.1. Framing the Issue
  • 14.1.1. Social Dimensions
  • 14.1.2. Developmental Dimensions
  • 14.1.3. Legal Dimensions
  • 14.1.4. Technical Dimensions
  • 14.1.5. Economic Dimensions
  • 14.2. On the Impact on Children of Exposure to Sexually Explicit Material and Experiences
  • 14.3. On Approaches to Protection
  • 14.4. Trade-offs and Complexity
  • 14.4.1. Social and Educational Trade-offs
  • 14.4.2. Technology Trade-offs
  • 14.4.3. Public Policy Trade-offs
  • 14.5. Take-Away Messages for Different Parties
  • 14.5.1. Parents
  • 14.5.2. Teachers and Librarians
  • 14.5.3. Industry
  • 14.5.4. Makers of Public Policy
  • 14.6. Research Needs
  • 14.7. Conclusion
  • Appendixes
  • A. Information-Gathering Sessions of the Committee
  • B. Glossary and Acronyms
  • C. Selected Technology Issues
  • D. Site Visit Synthesis
  • E. Biographies
  • Index