A dinosaur named after me /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Most, Bernard, author.
Edition:First edition.
Imprint:San Diego : Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, [1991]
©1991
Description:32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm.
Language:English
Series:Voyager books
Voyager books.
Edward Valauskas Collection of Dinosauriana.
Subject:Dinosaurs -- Juvenile literature.
Dust jackets (Binding)
Format: Print Book
Local Note:University of Chicago Library's copy is from the Edward Valauskas Collection of Dinosauriana.
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/12755031
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Edward Valauskas Collection of Dinosauriana.
ISBN:0152234942
9780152234942
Provenance:Copy 1. Gift of Edward Valauskas.
Binding: includes dust jacket.
Summary:Draws parallels between the physical characteristics and capabilities of particular dinosaurs and specific children and incorporates the name of each child into that of the dinosaur.
Review by Booklist Review

Ages 5-7. A picture book in which Most leads children through cheerful wordplay relating kids' names to those of dinosaurs. Each page includes a snazzy drawing of a type of dinosaur and a smaller picture of a child, who contributes a few bits of information about the beast and then either expresses satisfaction with the dinosaur's name or suggests a name change. For example, Dan thinks he does such a good imitation of Iguanodon that the beast should be called "Iguano-DAN"; Zach would have named Brachiosaurus "ZACH-iosaurus"; Pat, on the other hand, approves of the name "A-PAT-osaurus." Most's colorful dinosaur pictures will please young children just as much as the mildly humorous text and the name game. While the idea seems a bit overextended (27 names in all), classroom teachers need not follow the text straight through. They can break off at any point to let students have fun matching their own names with dinosaurs, or as Diane would say, "DIANE-osaurs." ~--Carolyn Phelan

From Booklist, Copyright (c) American Library Association. Used with permission.
Review by Publisher's Weekly Review

There is no dearth of dinosaur books, and for good reason: children love to read about these long-gone creatures. Most has made many satisfying contributions to this topic ( Dinosaur Cousins ; Whatever Happened to the Dinosaurs? ; If the Dinosaurs Came Back ), but his newest book has an especially refreshing twist. Each page features a child introducing a dino--25 in all--and describing its behavioral and physical characteristics. The child tells about him-/herself, too, with an argument for renaming the dinosaur after him/her. For example: ``My favorite dinosaur is Tyrannosaurus Rex, the biggest, meanest, fiercest, most powerful meat eater ever found . . . when I have a bad day or lose my temper, my dad calls me RYAN-osaurus Rex!'' Solid scientific information shares space with fictional youngsters in an ingenious way. Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Review by School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 3-- Most children would love to share a name with a prehistoric creature, and here it's as easy as finding their name within a dinosaur's moniker (as Pat in Apatasaurus)--or by changing part of a dinosaur name that rhymes with their own. Actually, there's no real story here but rather a series of cameos featuring a ``terrible lizard'' and a child. Stegosaurus, renamed Gregosaurus, is described as having huge plates on its back for protection and to make it appear larger to other meat-eating beasts. It so happens that Greg is a football player who is shown fully suited in gear that protects him and makes him look larger to opposing teams. Most's familiar style is playful and colorful without being too cartoonish. Dinosaurs in action are framed at the tops of the pages with their names and pronunciations above. Below are large-type, double-spaced text and the happy honored child. All the dinosaurs are represented again with their scientific names and pronunciations on the inside covers and endpapers. This book should be a hit with children, and it does present some scientific information. --Denia Lewis Hester, Dewey School, Evanston, IL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Horn Book Review

A book about dinosaurs contains little concrete information and an unclear text. The illustrations have the traditional colorful approach characteristic of Most's dinosaur books. From HORN BOOK 1991, (c) Copyright 2010. The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright The Horn Book, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Review by Booklist Review


Review by Publisher's Weekly Review


Review by School Library Journal Review


Review by Horn Book Review