¿Qué sabemos de las qillqas bajo el gobierno del Inca? /

According to the conquerors and missionaries of the 16th century, and according to the researchers of the 20th and 21st centuries, the inhabitants of the Andes, before the Spanish conquest, had no tradition of writing. This widely disclosed and accepted conviction caused investigators, with very few...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Szeminski, Jan, author.
Edition:Primera edición.
Imprint:Lima : Ediciones El Lector, 2019.
©2019.
Description:149 pages : illustrations, charts ; 20 cm.
Language:Spanish
Subject:Indians of South America -- Peru -- Language -- Writing.
Indians of South America -- Andes Region -- Language -- Writing.
Picture writing -- Peru.
Picture writing -- Andes Region.
Quipu -- Peru.
Peru -- Antiquities.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/12479992
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9786124765070
6124765071
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (pages 141-149).
In Spanish.
Summary:According to the conquerors and missionaries of the 16th century, and according to the researchers of the 20th and 21st centuries, the inhabitants of the Andes, before the Spanish conquest, had no tradition of writing. This widely disclosed and accepted conviction caused investigators, with very few exceptions, not to engage in research into the problem of writing in the Andes. The Inca elite of Cusco was a minority that dominated a large geographical space with various types of graphic records in a language, or languages, called khipu-s, t'uqapu-s and qillqa-s. One of the tools they used to achieve administrative control of this space was the Quechua language. The objective of this work is to questions the previous understanding and review the arguments in favor of their existence, during the Inca domain, of notation, various types of phonemic and ideographic language systems.