John 4:1-42 among the biblical well encounters : Pentateuchal and Johannine narrative reconsidered / 542

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Wyckoff, Eric John, 1963- author.
Imprint:Tübingen : Mohr Siebeck, [2020]
Gomaringen : Printed by Laupp & Göbel.
©2020
Description:xx, 327 pages ; 24 cm
Language:English
Ancient Greek
Hebrew
Series:Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. 2. Reihe, 0340-9570 ; 542
Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament. 2. Reihe ; 542.
Subject:Bible. -- John -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Bible. -- John -- Relation to the Old Testament.
Bible. -- Genesis, XXIV -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Bible. -- Genesis, XXIX -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Bible. -- Exodus, II -- Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Bible. -- John.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/12460870
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9783161596148
3161596145
9783161596155
3161596153
Notes:Thesis (doctoral) (with minor alterations)--Studium Biblicum Franciscanum, Jerusalem, 2020.--Page vii.
Includes bibliographical references (pages 271-293) and indexes.
Includes quotations in Greek, or Hebrew and Greek.
Summary:"In this study, Eric John Wyckoff proposes a new approach to an ongoing scholarly discussion. How can the relationship among the encounters at wells narrated in the Pentateuch (Genesis 24 and 29, Exodus 2) and the New Testament (John 4) be defined? Does the latter assume the reader's familiarity with the former? If so, then what sort of interpretation of the Torah texts is presupposed, and what significance does this have for the exegesis of the Gospel pericope? The author analyzes the literary parallels and investigates textual clues as to how these came to be intertwined with words and actions of Jesus and thematically refocused in the Fourth Gospel. What comes to light is a complex interrelation which does not fall neatly into a single literary category, inviting readers to interpret the Johannine Samaria narrative in light of three passages from the Pentateuch, and vice versa." --provided by publisher
"In this volume, Eric John Wyckoff examines four biblical texts which narrate encounters between a woman and a man at a well. The episodes in Genesis 24 and 29, Exodus 2 and John 4 share similar literary features, but the contrasts are revealing. Their complex interrelation represents an interpretive key."--Page 4 of printed paper wrapper.
Standard no.:9783161596148
Table of Contents:
  • Preface
  • Abbreviations
  • 1.1.1.2. Literary and theological milieu
  • 1.1.2.2. Abraham's servant and Rebecca (Gen 24:1-67)
  • 1.1.2.4. Moses and Zipporah and her sisters (Exod 2:15-22)
  • 1.1.4. Summary
  • 1.2.2.1. Gnostic sources in a complex redaction process
  • Introduction: Posing the Question
  • 1.1. Selecting the Texts
  • 1.1.1.1. Narrative structure
  • 1.1.2.1. Jesus and a woman of Samaria (John 4:1-42)
  • 1.1.3. Textual witnesses
  • Chapter 1. Shaping an Approach
  • 1.2.2. Primarily diachronic approaches
  • 1.1.1. Rationale
  • 1.1.2. The selected passages and their delimitation
  • 1.2.1. Pre-critical approaches
  • 1.1.2.3. Jacob and Rachel (Gen 29:1-14)
  • 1.2. Navigating a Sea of Scholarship
  • 1.2.2.2. Basis in a historical event
  • 1.2.2.3. A Christian midrash on Genesis 24
  • 1.2.2.4. Moses typology from Exodus 2
  • 1.2.2.5. Jacob traditions from Genesis 29 and other sources
  • 1.2.3. Primarily synchronic approaches
  • 1.2.3.2. A parody of the betrothal type scene
  • 1.2.3.4. An allusion to the betrothal type scene
  • 1.2.3.5. Reassessing the betrothal type scene
  • 1.2.4.1. Scripture as a hermeneutical screen
  • 1.2.3.1. An adaptation of the betrothal type scene
  • 1.2.3.3. An allegory on the betrothal type scene
  • 1.2.4. Approaches combining synchronic and diachronic processes
  • 1.2.4.2. Intertextual approaches
  • 1.2.5. Conclusions
  • 1.2.5.1. Lasting contributions from previous scholarship
  • 1.2.5.2. Ongoing lacunae
  • 1.3. Suiting the Method to the Task
  • 1.3.1. Basic assertions
  • 1.3.2. A three-dimensional textual relationship
  • 1.3.2.1. Intertextuality
  • 1.3.2.2. Hypertextuality
  • 1.3.2.3. Architextuality
  • 1.3.2.4. The three dimensions in interaction
  • 1.3.3. A three-dimensional approach
  • 1.3.3.1. Intertextual theory
  • 1.3.3.2. The relecture hermeneutical model
  • 1.3.3.3. The type scene as a narrative convention
  • 1.4. Summary
  • Chapter 2. Identifying Literary Parallels
  • 2.1. Parallel Elements Shared by All Four Texts
  • 2.1.1. Vocabulary
  • 2.1.1.1. Water and associated activities
  • 2.1.1.2. Movement and travelling
  • 2.1.1.3. Family, livestock, announcement, and hospitality
  • 2.1.1.4. Semantic fields attested in all but one episode
  • 2.1.2. Setting
  • 2.1.3. Plot
  • 2.1.3.1. Similarities
  • 2.1.3.2. Contrasts
  • 2.1.3.3. Johannine innovations
  • 2.1.4. Characters
  • 2.1.4.1. The man on a journey
  • 2.1.4.2. Shepherds and subordinates
  • 2.1.4.3. The woman at the well
  • 2.1.4.4. The woman's kinfolk
  • 2.2. Specific Parallels with Genesis 24:1-67
  • 2.2.1. Vocabulary
  • 2.2.2. Setting
  • 2.2.3. Plot
  • 2.2.4. Characters
  • 2.3. Specific Parallels with Genesis 29:1-14
  • 2.3.1. Vocabulary
  • 2.3.2. Setting
  • 2.3.3. Plot
  • 2.3.4. Characters
  • 2.4. Specific Parallels with Exodus 2:15-22
  • 2.4.1. Narrative context
  • 2.4.2. Plot (and vocabulary)
  • 2.4.3. A subtle play on words?
  • 2.5. Observations
  • 2.5.1. Quantitative observations
  • 2.5.2. Qualitative observations
  • Chapter 3. Looking behind the Text
  • 3.1. Johannine Postresurrection Reflection
  • 3.1.1. Characteristics
  • 3.1.1.1. Memory
  • 3.1.1.2. Postresurrection perspective
  • 3.1.1.3. The Paraclete as guide
  • 3.1.1.4. Communal dynamic
  • 3.1.2. Content
  • 3.1.2.1. Testimony
  • 3.1.2.2. Scripture
  • 3.1.2.3. Testimony and Scripture in reciprocal interaction
  • 3.2. Testimony Remembered in John 4:1-42
  • 3.2.1. Beyond the parallels
  • 3.2.1.1. Baptizing and making disciples (vv. 1-2)
  • 3.2.1.2. Living water (vv. 10-15)
  • 3.2.1.3. Worship in spirit and truth (vv. 20-24)
  • 3.2.1.4. Spiritual food (vv. 31-34)
  • 3.2.1.5. The harvest (vv. 35-38)
  • 3.2.2. Comparisons with the Synoptic tradition
  • 3.2.2.1. The mission as harvest
  • 3.2.2.2. Jesus and a non-Jewish woman
  • 3.2.3. Summary
  • 3.3. Scripture Remembered in John 4:1-42
  • 3.3.1. Shared motifs
  • 3.3.2. Observations
  • 3.4. Plausible Motivations
  • 3.4.1. Plausible historical motivations
  • 3.4.1.1. Missionary concerns
  • 3.4.1.2. Jews and Samaritans
  • 3.4.1.3. Related texts from the Synoptic tradition
  • 3.4.2. Plausible theological motivations
  • 3.5. Conclusions
  • 3.5.1. Envisioning the Process
  • 3.5.2. Towards Interpretation
  • Chapter 4. Reading the Rereading
  • 4.1. The Motif of Journey
  • 4.1.1. Literary context of the journey motif
  • 4.1.2. Textual shape of the journey motif
  • 4.1.3. Making the associations recognizable
  • 4.1.3.1. Parallel structure of the journey motif
  • 4.1.3.2. The protagonist avoids a threat
  • 4.1.3.3. The protagonist arrives at the well
  • 4.1.4. Adding a connotation to the journey motif
  • 4.1.4.1. Making and baptizing disciples
  • 4.1.4.2. A divine necessity
  • 4.2. The Motif of Water
  • 4.2.1. Literary context of the water motif
  • 4.2.2. Textual shape of the water motif
  • 4.2.3. Making the associations more recognizable
  • 4.2.4. Developing the water motif metaphorically
  • 4.2.4.1. The metaphor introduced
  • 4.2.4.2. The metaphor misunderstood
  • 4.2.4.3. The metaphor explained
  • 4.3. The Motif of Socioethnic Barriers
  • 4.3.1. Literary context of the socioethnic barriers motif
  • 4.3.2. Textual shape of the socioethnic barriers motif
  • 4.3.3. Intensifying the motif
  • 4.3.4. Challenging factionalist attitudes
  • 4.3.5. Expanding the impact of the motif
  • 4.4. The Motif of Matrimony and Progeny
  • 4.4.1. Literary context of the matrimony and progeny motif
  • 4.4.2. Textual shape of the matrimony and progeny motif
  • 4.4.3. Reinforcing the associations
  • 4.4.4. Matrimony and progeny on the literal level
  • 4.4.4.1. An unexpected twist in the plot
  • 4.4.4.2. Jesus' extraordinary feat
  • 4.4.4.3. A need for God's gift
  • 4.4.5. Matrimony and progeny on the figurative level
  • 4.4.5.1. Nuptial connotations
  • 4.4.5.2. The six men interpreted metaphorically
  • 4.4.5.3. Implicit associations
  • 4.5. The Motif of Recognition
  • 4.5.1. Literary context of the recognition motif
  • 4.5.2. Textual shape of the recognition motif
  • 4.5.3. Adding a connotation to the recognition motif
  • 4.5.3.1. Initial perception challenged
  • 4.5.3.2. Scriptural comparison
  • 4.5.3.3. Intermediate perception confirmed
  • 4.5.3.4. Final perception
  • 4.6. The Motif of Worship
  • 4.6.1. Literary context of the worship motif
  • 4.6.2. Textual shape of the worship motif
  • 4.6.3. Expanding the impact of the motif
  • 4.6.3.1. Cultic rivalry and socioethnic barriers
  • 4.6.3.2. Culmination together with other motifs
  • 4.6.4. Intensifying the motif
  • 4.6.4.1. Right worship explained
  • 4.6.4.2. Worship and (not) knowing
  • 4.7. The Motif of Announcement
  • 4.7.1. Literary context of the announcement motif
  • 4.7.2. Textual shape of the announcement motif
  • 4.7.3. Reinforcing the associations
  • 4.7.3.1. An initial report
  • 4.7.3.2. A sudden change of topic
  • 4.7.3.3. Haste and urgency
  • 4.7.3.4. Announcing the words/things
  • 4.7.4. Adding a connotation to the announcement motif
  • 4.7.4.1. The announcement itself
  • 4.7.4.2. Additional, extended application of the motif
  • 4.7.4.3. Culmination of the announcement motif
  • 4.8. The Motif of Food
  • 4.8.1. Literary context and textual shape of the food motif
  • 4.8.2. Developing the food motif metaphorically
  • 4.9. The Motif of Work
  • 4.9.2. Textual shape of the work motif
  • 4.9.3. Work in the literal sense
  • 4.9.4. Developing the work motif metaphorically
  • 4.8.2.1. Literal versus metaphorical food
  • 4.8.2.2. The metaphor explained
  • 4.9.1. Literary context of the work motif
  • 4.9.4.1. Undeveloped metaphorical potential of the work motif
  • 4.9.4.2. The mission as a harvest
  • 4.10. The Motif of Welcome
  • 4.10.2. Adding a connotation to the welcome motif
  • 4.10.3. Bringing other motifs to resolution
  • 4.11. The Ten Motifs and Their Rereading
  • Chapter 5. Conclusions
  • 5.1. Defining the Textual Relationship
  • 5.1.1. A web of parallels
  • 5.1.2. A mutual rereading
  • 5.2. Exegetical Conclusions for John 4:1-42
  • 5.2.1. The role of the reader
  • 5.2.2. Literary unity
  • 5.2.3. The motifs and their rereading
  • 5.2.4. Theme
  • 5.2.5. Open-endedness
  • 5.3. Underlying Interpretations of Scripture
  • 5.4. Directions for Future Research
  • Bibliography
  • Index of Ancient Sources
  • Subject Index
  • Index of Modern Authors
  • 4.10.1. Literary context and textual shape of the welcome motif