Bibliographic Details

The Romantic crowd : sympathy, controversy and print culture / Mary Fairclough.

Author / Creator Fairclough, Mary, 1978- author.
Imprint Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013.
Description 1 online resource (ix, 294 pages) : illustrations
Language English
Series Cambridge studies in Romanticism ; [97]
Cambridge studies in Romanticism ; 97.
Subject Englisch, ...
Sympathy -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century.
Sympathy -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Romanticism -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century.
Romanticism -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Social values -- Great Britain -- History -- 18th century.
Social values -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Press and politics -- Great Britain -- History -- 19th century.
Collective behavior -- Moral and ethical aspects.
LITERARY CRITICISM -- European -- English, Irish, Scottish, Welsh.
Press and politics.
Public opinion, British.
Romanticism.
Social values.
Sympathy.
Literatur
Sympathie
Druckmedien
France -- History -- Revolution, 1789-1799 -- Foreign public opinion, British.
France.
Great Britain.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
History.
Format E-Resource, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11832127
ISBN 9781139382724
1139382721
9781139626026
1139626027
9781139616720
1139616722
9781139613002
1139613006
9781107031692
1107031699
9781283943260
1283943263
1139611143
9781139611145
1139622307
9781139622301
1139609327
9781139609326
9781107566668
1107566665
Digital file characteristics data file
Notes Includes bibliographical references (pages 266-287) and index.
English.
Summary "In the long eighteenth century, sympathy was understood not just as an emotional bond, but also as a physiological force, through which disruption in one part of the body produces instantaneous disruption in another. Building on this theory, Romantic writers explored sympathy as a disruptive social phenomenon, which functioned to spread disorder between individuals and even across nations like a 'contagion'. It thus accounted for the instinctive behaviour of people swept up in a crowd. During this era sympathy assumed a controversial political significance, as it came to be associated with both riotous political protest and the diffusion of information through the press. Mary Fairclough reads Edmund Burke, Mary Wollstonecraft, William Godwin, John Thelwall, William Hazlitt and Thomas De Quincey alongside contemporary political, medical and philosophical discourse. Many of their central questions about crowd behaviour still remain to be answered by the modern discourse of collective psychology"--
Other form Print version: Fairclough, Mary, 1978- Romantic crowd. Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 2013 9781107031692