Justice in America : the separate realities of blacks and whites /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Peffley, Mark, author.
Imprint:Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Description:1 online resource (xiii, 259 pages) : illustrations
Language:English
Series:Cambridge studies in public opinion and political psychology
Cambridge studies in public opinion and political psychology.
Subject:Criminal justice, Administration of -- United States -- Public opinion.
Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- United States -- Public opinion.
Discrimination in law enforcement -- United States.
Whites -- United States -- Attitudes.
African Americans -- Attitudes.
LAW -- Criminal Law -- General.
African Americans -- Attitudes.
Criminal justice, Administration of -- Public opinion.
Discrimination in law enforcement.
Race relations.
Whites -- Attitudes.
Rechtssystem
Rassendiskriminierung
Strafrechtspflege.
Strafvollzug.
Diskriminierung.
Öffentliche Meinung.
United States -- Race relations.
United States.
USA.
USA.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11826733
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other title:Torrossa Casalini full text platform.
Other authors / contributors:Hurwitz, Jon, author.
ISBN:9780511932526
0511932529
9780511922114
0511922116
9780511852374
0511852371
9780511929847
0511929846
9780511760761
0511760760
1107203457
9781107203457
1282908146
9781282908147
9786612908149
6612908149
0511931182
9780511931185
0511927347
9780511927348
0511924801
9780511924804
9780521119252
0521119251
9780521134750
0521134757
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
English.
Print version record.
Summary:"As reactions to the O.J. Simpson verdict, the Rodney King beating, and the Amadou Diallo killing make clear, whites and African Americans in the United States inhabit two different perceptual worlds, with the former seeing the justice system as largely fair and color blind and the latter believing it to be replete with bias and discrimination. Drawing on data from a nation-wide survey of both races, the authors tackle two important questions in this book: what explains the widely differing perceptions, and why do such differences matter? They attribute much of the racial chasm to the relatively common personal confrontations that many blacks have with law enforcement - confrontations seldom experienced by whites. And more importantly, the authors demonstrate that this racial chasm is consequential: it leads African Americans to react much more cynically to incidents of police brutality and racial profiling, and also to be far more skeptical of punitive anti-crime policies ranging from the death penalty to three-strikes laws"--Publisher description
Other form:Print version: Peffley, Mark. Justice in America. Cambridge ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2010 9780521119252
Standard no.:99950384520