The archaeology of Micronesia /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Rainbird, Paul.
Imprint:Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Description:1 online resource (xii, 301 pages) : illustrations, map
Language:English
Series:Cambridge world archaeology
Cambridge world archaeology.
Subject:Anthropology -- Micronesia.
Material culture -- Micronesia.
HISTORY.
Anthropology.
Antiquities.
Civilization.
Material culture.
Micronesia -- Antiquities.
Micronesia -- Civilization.
Micronesia -- History.
Micronesia.
Electronic books.
History.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11812988
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:0511210892
9780511210891
0521651883
9780521651882
0521656303
9780521656306
0511207298
9780511207297
0511212666
9780511212666
0511216262
9780511216268
0511214472
9780511214479
9780511616952
0511616953
1280540362
9781280540363
0511315147
9780511315145
Digital file characteristics:data file
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (pages 255-292) and index.
English.
Print version record.
Summary:In the first book-length archaeological study of Micronesia, Paul Rainbird surveys the development of the islands beginning with the earliest process of human colonisation and places this development within the broader context of Pacific Island studies. The book draws on a wide range of archaeological, anthropological and historical sources.
Other form:Print version: Rainbird, Paul. Archaeology of Micronesia. Cambridge, UK ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 2004
Review by Choice Review

Rainbird's comprehensive work elegantly sets forth a new paradigm of fluidity, fusion, and flux. Extensive detail demonstrates the value of each paradigm segment. Thus, "fluidity" refers to the sea as well as complex trade routes. "Fusion" includes long-distance trade contacts and the concomitant cultural influences. "Flux" refers to how the islanders altered their landscape to make their environment more favorable. Rainbird's analysis of the megalithic city of Nan Madol on Pohnpei argues for a shift from the urbanization construct to the canonical matrilineal clan. Such clans combine actual and negotiated ancestry. Nan Madol's structural modification was one way to signal individual ancestry and provide mnemonic aids to genealogical claims. Rainbird (Univ. of Wales, Lampeter) considers the full importance of women and the social complexity of matrilineal society throughout the book. Fluidity, fusion, and flux break new ground and can apply to many other regions. On many levels a thought-provoking work, it makes the point that connections, rather than boundaries, are key. Rainbird uses all available archival and recent sources and provides maps, tables, black-and-white illustrations, and an excellent index. ^BSumming Up: Essential. All Micronesian and Pacific collections. Highly recommended. All upper-division archaeology collections. L. A. Kimball Western Washington University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review