Greek slave systems in their Eastern Mediterranean context, c.800-146 BC /

The economic underpinnings of ancient Greek elite culture are explored in detail in this study of systems of slavery across the Greek world, which sets such practices in their broader Eastern Mediterranean context to highlight points of resemblance and contrast and shed light on the complex circumst...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Lewis, David M. (David Malcolm), author.
Edition:First edition.
Imprint:Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2018.
©2018
Description:xii, 372 pages ; 25 cm
Language:English
Subject:Slavery -- Greece -- History.
Slavery -- Middle East -- History.
Greece -- History -- To 146 B.C.
Middle East -- History -- To 622.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11807297
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9780198769941
0198769946
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (pages 307-350) and indexes.
Summary:The economic underpinnings of ancient Greek elite culture are explored in detail in this study of systems of slavery across the Greek world, which sets such practices in their broader Eastern Mediterranean context to highlight points of resemblance and contrast and shed light on the complex circumstances from which Greek slavery emerged.
Review by Choice Review

Lewis (Edinburgh, UK) takes a good stab at a complex subject. He defines the term "slave" only on pages 25--27 though he has used the term himself innumerable times before that. The author seems to be giving a rebuttal of a 1981 work by Moses I. Finley about slavery in the Greek and Roman worlds being somehow different from slavery in other parts of the world closely surrounding the Greeks and Romans. One problem with using this as the basis for his argument is that Lewis assumes Finley's is still the most widely accepted view. However, he has not proved this starting point. Lewis also tends to use jargon when it is not necessary. One example comes on page 9, where he complains about terminology in the field and then concludes that it is a "pleonasm." Another is where he remarks that something is "etic, not emic," thus falling into jargon himself. Lewis has done extensive research in fields separated quite a bit geographically and chronologically. His bibliography is extensive. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students through faculty. --Dorothy Anne Slane, University of Maryland University College

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review