Tunisia : the political economy of reform /

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Boulder, Colo. : L. Rienner, 1991.
Description:xi, 267 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Language:English
Series:SAIS African studies library
SAIS African studies library (Boulder, Colo.)
Subject:Diplomatic relations.
Economic history.
Economic policy.
Politics and government.
Social conditions.
Tunisia -- Economic policy.
Tunisia -- Economic conditions -- 1956-1987
Tunisia -- Politics and government.
Tunisia -- Social conditions.
Tunisia -- Foreign relations.
Tunisia.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/1171456
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Zartman, I. William
ISBN:1555872301 (alk. paper) : $32.00
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (p. 243-255) and index.
Review by Choice Review

A superb collection of 13 essays on the political, economic, and social problems of modern Tunisia, focused primarily upon the post-Bourguiba era, November 7, 1987, to the present. Ably edited by Zartman, one of the foremost Maghreb specialists in the US, this work is the fruit of a School of Advanced International Studies Conference on contemporary Tunisia held in April 1989. The essays are of such uniformly high quality that the collection should remain a classic analysis of contemporary Tunisia for some time to come. The strongest contributions to the collection are those analyzing political reform and the Islamic movement in Tunisia. The four essays on economic restructuring are of a highly technical character and of primary interest only to the specialist. Predictions concerning the fate of the current regime of President Ben Ali are guardedly pessimistic. As Professor Susan Waltz expresses it, "Old patterns of personal rule are reestablishing themselves." Outstanding bibliography and good index. Strongly recommended for faculty, graduate students, and upper-level undergraduates.-L. P. Fickett Jr., Mary Washington College

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review