Fighting for girls : new perspectives on gender and violence /

Have girls really gone wild? Despite the media fascination with "bad girls," facts beyond the hype have remained unclear. Fighting for Girls focuses on these facts, and using the best data available about actual trends in girls' uses of violence, the scholars here find that by virtual...

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2010.
Description:1 online resource (x, 266 pages) : illustrations
Language:English
Series:SUNY series in women, crime, and criminology
SUNY series in women, crime, and criminology.
Subject:Female juvenile delinquents -- United States.
Teenage girls -- United States.
Violence -- United States.
Juvenile justice, Administration of -- United States.
Discrimination in criminal justice administration -- United States.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Criminology.
Discrimination in criminal justice administration.
Female juvenile delinquents.
Juvenile justice, Administration of.
Teenage girls.
Violence.
Weibliche Jugend
Gewalttätigkeit
Weibliche Jugend.
Gewalttätigkeit.
Ungdomsbrottslingar -- genusaspekter.
Ungdomsbrottslighet -- genusaspekter.
Kvinnliga brottslingar.
Tonårsflickor.
Våld -- genusaspekter.
United States.
USA.
USA.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11284623
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Chesney-Lind, Meda.
Jones, Nikki, 1975-
ISBN:9781441674159
1441674152
9781438432953
143843295X
9781438432939
1438432933
9781438432946
1438432941
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
English.
Print version record.
Summary:Have girls really gone wild? Despite the media fascination with "bad girls," facts beyond the hype have remained unclear. Fighting for Girls focuses on these facts, and using the best data available about actual trends in girls' uses of violence, the scholars here find that by virtually any measure, incidents of girls violence are going down, not up. Additionally, rather than attributing gril's violence to personality or to girls becoming more like boys, the contributors examine the contexts that produce violence in girls, demonstrating how addressing the unique problems that confront girls in dating relationships, families, school hallways and classrooms, and in distressed urban neighborhoods can help reduce girls' use of violence. Often including girls' own voices, contributors illustrate why girls use violence in certain situations, encouraging us to pay attention to trauma in the girls pasts, as well as how violence becomes a tool for surviving toxic families, deteriorated neighborhoods, and neglectful schools.
"From a broad range of perspectives and empirical studies, this book addresses a number of important questions central to the study of girls and violence."--Sara Goodkind, University of Pittsburg.
Meda Chesney-Lind is Professor of Women's Studies at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.
Nikki Jones is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of California, Santa Barbara. --Book Jacket.
Other form:Print version: Fighting for girls. Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2010 9781438432939