The lure of literacy : a critical reception of the compulsory composition debate /

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Harker, Michael, 1976- author.
Imprint:Albany, New York : State University of New York Press, [2015]
©2015
Description:1 online resource (viii, 150 pages)
Language:English
Subject:English language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching.
English language -- Rhetoric -- Study and teaching (Higher)
Literacy.
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Composition & Creative Writing.
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Rhetoric.
REFERENCE -- Writing Skills.
English language -- Composition and exercises -- Study and teaching.
English language -- Rhetoric -- Study and teaching (Higher)
Literacy.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11238839
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9781438454962
1438454961
9781438454955
1438454953
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (pages 137-146) and index.
English.
Print version record.
Other form:Print version: Harker, Michael, 1976- Lure of literacy. Albany, NY : State University of New York Press, [2015] 9781438454955
Review by Choice Review

Required reading for anyone with a stake in the compulsory composition debate, The Lure of Literacy critically assesses a long-debated question: should the first-year writing requirement be abolished or reformed? Harker (Georgia State Univ.) first surveys proposals from both sides of the debate. His analysis, however, is conducted from the fresh perspective of so-called new literacy studies, which identifies several "myths" and "strong theories" of literacy. Shared by abolitionists and reformists alike, these myths, Harker asserts, often exaggerate the supposed benefits of both literacy in general (based on incongruous definitions of literacy) and the outcomes of the first-year composition curriculum more specifically. Harker concludes by proposing a course he calls First-Year Literacy Studies (FYLS). In Harker's words, the goal of FYLS will be to "interrogate the import, relevance, and nature of literacy." His thoughtfully rendered lesson plans include detailed lessons and instructor learning objectives. Harker's sensible strategy for reform thus elevates his position in the debate from critic to reformist in the truest sense of the word. The Lure of Literacy demonstrates that curriculum reform with an eye toward the improvement of student learning is both necessary and achievable. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --John David Harding, Saint Leo University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review