Phonology in perception /

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Berlin ; New York : Mouton de Gruyter, ©2009.
Description:1 online resource (318 pages) : illustrations
Language:English
Series:Phonology and phonetics ; 15
Phonology and phonetics ; 15.
Subject:Grammar, Comparative and general -- Phonology, Comparative.
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Phonology.
LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES -- Linguistics -- Phonetics & Phonology.
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Phonology.
Grammar, Comparative and general -- Phonology, Comparative.
Fonologie.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11214554
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Boersma, Paul.
Hamann, Silke, 1971-
ISBN:9783110219234
3110219239
9783110219227
3110219220
Digital file characteristics:text file PDF
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
In English.
Print version record.
Summary:This book investigates the extent to which phonological knowledge plays a role in speech perception. The speech perception process is formalized within the theoretical frameworks of Natural Phonology, Optimality Theory, and the Neigbourhood Activation Model. Examples come from the perception of segments, stress, and intonation in the fields of loanword adaptation, second language acquisition, and sound change.
Other form:Print version: Phonology in perception. Berlin ; New York : Mouton de Gruyter, ©2009 9783110219227
Standard no.:10.1515/9783110219234
Description
Summary:

The book consists of nine chapters dealing with the interaction of speech perception and phonology. Rather than accepting the common assumption that perceptual considerations influence phonological behaviour, the book aims to investigate the reverse direction of causation, namely the extent to which phonological knowledge guides the speech perception process.

Most of the chapters discuss formalizations of the speech perception process that involve ranked phonological constraints. Theoretical frameworks argued for are Natural Phonology, Optimality Theory, and the Neigbourhood Activation Model. The book discusses the perception of segments, stress, and intonation in the fields of loanword adaptation, second language acquisition, and sound change.

The book is of interest to phonologists, phoneticians and psycholinguists working on the phonetics-phonology interface, and to everybody who is interested in the idea that phonology is not production alone.

Physical Description:1 online resource (318 pages) : illustrations
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN:9783110219234
3110219239
9783110219227
3110219220