Genomes of herbaceous land plants / v. 69

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Amsterdam : Academic Press, 2014.
Description:1 online resource.
Language:English
Series:Advances in botanical research ; v. 69
Advances in botanical research ; v. 69.
Subject:Plant genomes.
Herbaceous plants.
SCIENCE -- Life Sciences -- Biochemistry.
Herbaceous plants.
Plant genomes.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11209508
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Paterson, Andrew H., 1960- editor.
ISBN:9780124171633
012417163X
9780124171824
0124171826
Notes:CIP data; resource not viewed.
Table of Contents:
  • Contributors
  • 1. A Backdrop: Principles of Plant Genome Organization
  • 1. Background for this Volume
  • 2. Recurring Features of Plant Genomes
  • References
  • 2. Evolution of Plant Genome Analysis
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Evolution of the Term Genome
  • 3. Cytology and Cytogenetics
  • 4. Genome Size Determination
  • 5. Renaturation Kinetics
  • 6. Genetic Mapping
  • 7. Physical Mapping
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 3. The Evolution of Plant Gene and Genome Sequencing
  • 1. The Early Period of Plant Gene Sequencing
  • 2. Random Sequencing of Expressed Genes for Discovery
  • 3. Evolution of DNA Sequencing Beyond Sanger Methodology
  • 4. The First Whole Plant Genome Sequences
  • 5. The Second Round of Whole Plant Genome Sequences
  • 6. Examples of the Many Recently Published Plant Genome Projects
  • 7. A Summary of the Trends
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • 4. The First Plant Genome Sequence-Arabidopsis thaliana
  • 2. Sequencing Strategy and Outcome
  • 3. Evolutionary History
  • 4. Conclusions
  • References
  • 1. Sequencing Strategies and Outcome
  • 2. The Rice Gene Set and Its Comparison to Dicots (Arabidopsis)
  • References
  • 1. Introduction
  • 5. The First Monocot Genome Sequence: Oryza sativa (Rice)
  • 3. Evolutionary History (Especially Genome Duplication)
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Phytogeny and Evolution of Eudicot Plants
  • 3. Sequencing of Eudicot Genomes
  • 5. Structural Comparison of Eudicot Genomes and Widespread Ancient Genome Duplications
  • 6. Progress in Reconstructing the Eudicot Ancestral Genome
  • 7. Further Inferences on Genome Structure Evolution
  • 8. Perspective
  • Acknowledgements
  • References
  • 7. Insights into the Common Ancestor of Cereals
  • 2. Genome Sequencing Opens a New Era of Grass Research
  • 3. Gene Colinearity Contributes to Decipher Genome Structure
  • 4. An Ancestral Polyploidization Presides the Divergence of Major Cereals
  • 6. Recombination Between Homoeologous Chromosomes
  • 8. Early History of the Angiosperms
  • 6. Insights into the Common Ancestor of Eudicots
  • 4. The Gamma Paleohexaploidy in Ancestral Eudicot Lineages
  • 9. Summary
  • References
  • 1. The Economic and Agricultural Importance of Cereals
  • 5. Large-Scale Genomic Repatterning Followed Whole-Genome Duplication
  • 8. Inference of the Gene Composition of Ancestral Genomes
  • 7. Alignment of Multiple Genomes
  • Acknowledgements
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Plant Genome Comparisons and Paleopolyploidy Events
  • 3. Analytic Tools and Workflow for Genome Comparisons
  • 4. Dating and Naming of Paleopolyploidy Events
  • 5. Circumscribing the Paneudicot Paleohexaploidy
  • 6. Circumscribing Ancient Polyploidy Events in Monocots
  • 7. Effective Comparisons Between Eudicot and Monocot Genomes Through PARs
  • 8. Panangiosperm Comparisons Through Ancestral Genome Reconstruction
  • 9. Deeply Conserved Noncoding Sequences in Flowering Plants
  • 10. Future Prospects
  • References
  • 9. Prehistory of the Angiosperms: Characterization of the Ancient Genomes
  • 1. Brief Evolutionary History from Algae to Flowering Plants
  • 2. Chloroplast Genome Evolution in Land Plants
  • 4. The First Model Moss Genome Sequence: P. patens
  • 5. The First Lycophyte Genome Sequence: Selaginella moellendorffii
  • 7. Overview of Genomic Analyses in Gymnosperms
  • 8. Ancestral Polyploidy Events Before the Origin of Angiosperms
  • 9. Conclusion and Future Studies
  • References
  • 10. Decoding the Epigenomes of Herbaceous Plants
  • 2. DNA Methylation
  • 3. Nucleosome Positioning and Occupancy
  • 3. An Ancient Green Algae Model Organism: C. reinhardtii
  • 6. Current Knowledge of Ferns Based on Limited Genomic Resources
  • 1. Introduction
  • 4. Histone Variants
  • 5. Histone Modifications
  • 6. Concluding Remarks and Future Directions
  • References
  • 11. The Plant Microbiome
  • 1. Background
  • 2. Currency of the Microbiome: Exudates
  • 3. Ecology of the Microbiome
  • 4. Importance of the Microbiome to Plant Genomics
  • 5. Conclusions
  • References
  • 12. Population Genomics of Plant Species
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. Genetic Diversity in Plant Populations
  • 3. Mutation Rate Variation
  • 4. Mating-System Effects on Genetic Diversity
  • 5. Adaptation in Plant Populations
  • 6. Deleterious Variation in Plant Populations
  • 7. The Effects of Linked Selection
  • 8. Mapping of Quantitative Trait Loci
  • 9. Advances Through Whole Genome Resequencing
  • 10. Conclusion
  • References
  • 13. A Short Course on the Impact of Gene Duplications on the Evolution of Novelty
  • 1. First Day of Class
  • 2. Lesson 1: Duplication of Genes and the Relaxation of Selection
  • 3. Lesson 2: Measuring Genetic Divergence and Its Meaning
  • 4. Lesson 3: Visualizing DNA Sequence Divergence Using GEvo in CoGe Running on iPlant Servers (Use Firefox)
  • 5. Lesson 4: Visualizing Whole-Genome Duplications and Whole-Genome Divergence: SynMap (Use Firefox)
  • 6. Lesson 5: Polyploids
  • 7. Lesson 6: Fractionation
  • 8. Lesson 7: Subfunctionalization, Nonfunctionalization (and Neofunctionalization)
  • 9. Lesson 8: The Gene Balance Hypothesis
  • 10. Lesson 9: Different Sorts of Gene Duplication Change the Gene Content of the Genome in Different Ways, and How the Subfunctionalization Idea Became Downgraded
  • 11. Lesson 10: Drive
  • 12. Lesson 11: Balanced Gene Drive
  • 13. Lesson 12: Genome Dominance
  • 14. Lesson 13: Chimps, Man and a Goodbye Present
  • Acknowledgement
  • References
  • 14. Synthetic Haplotypes, Species, Karyotypes, and Protoorganisms?
  • 1. Synthetic Haplotypes
  • 2. Novel Polyploids: Synthetic Plant Species
  • 3. Synthetic Karyotypes: Introducing Artificial Chromosomes into a Genome
  • 4. Protoorganisms: Mitigating the Constraints of a Sporophytic Stage of Development
  • 5. Synthesis
  • References
  • Author Index
  • Subject Index