From agriculture to agricology : towards a glocal circular economy /

Professor Dani Wadada Naudere, a respected academic and educator from Uganda, dedicated his life to applying and spreading the notion of 'community sites of knowledge', which simply means using indigenous tools of knowledge to revitalise the lives of Africa's people. He staunchly beli...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Nabudere, Dani.
Imprint:Johannesburg : Mapungubwe Institute for Strategic Reflection, [2013]
Description:1 online resource (223 pages) : portrait
Language:English
Subject:Sustainable agriculture.
Agriculture -- Economic aspects.
Agriculture -- Environmental aspects.
Globalization.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Ethnic Studies -- African American Studies.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Essays.
SOCIAL SCIENCE -- Reference.
Agriculture -- Economic aspects.
Agriculture -- Environmental aspects.
Globalization.
Sustainable agriculture.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11209317
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9781920655303
1920655301
9781920655310
192065531X
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
Online resource; title from PDF title page (ebrary, viewed October 11, 2013).
Summary:Professor Dani Wadada Naudere, a respected academic and educator from Uganda, dedicated his life to applying and spreading the notion of 'community sites of knowledge', which simply means using indigenous tools of knowledge to revitalise the lives of Africa's people. He staunchly believed that the liberation of Africans depended largely on self-reliance, and that any dependence on imported knowledge and material instruments could only lead to the entrenchment of colonial stereotypes, which dictated that ideas and knowledge that emanate from the West are superior to those that originate from the continent. His commitment to finding African solutions to historical and structural problems, underlined his faith in the value of indigenous knowledge. He understood that African indigenous knowledge carries in its DNA the roots of 'complex ecosystems' that require the inputs of a diversity of expertise and experiences and that it seemed counterproductive to maintain the language of inclusion and exclusion inherited from colonialism. This work explores Nabudere's strong belief that we can reclaim the future by producing knowledge that is relevant for society, and for the continued participation in civic causes designed to assist the wretched of the earth.