Shocking representation : historical trauma, national cinema, and the modern horror film /

In this imaginative new work, Adam Lowenstein explores the ways in which a group of groundbreaking horror films engaged the haunting social conflicts left in the wake of World War II, Hiroshima, and the Vietnam War. Lowenstein centers Shocking Representation around readings of films by Georges Franj...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Lowenstein, Adam.
Imprint:New York : Columbia University Press, ©2005.
Description:1 online resource (xii, 255 pages) : illustrations.
Language:English
Series:Film and culture
Film and culture.
Subject:Horror films -- History and criticism.
Motion pictures and history.
PERFORMING ARTS -- Film & Video -- Reference.
PERFORMING ARTS -- Film & Video -- History & Criticism.
Horror films.
Motion pictures and history.
Music, Dance, Drama & Film.
Film.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11141539
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:0231507186
9780231507189
0231132468
9780231132466
0231132476
9780231132473
Notes:Includes bibliographical references (pages 221-240) and index.
Print version record.
Summary:In this imaginative new work, Adam Lowenstein explores the ways in which a group of groundbreaking horror films engaged the haunting social conflicts left in the wake of World War II, Hiroshima, and the Vietnam War. Lowenstein centers Shocking Representation around readings of films by Georges Franju, Michael Powell, Shindo Kaneto, Wes Craven, and David Cronenberg. He shows that through allegorical representations these directors' films confronted and challenged comforting historical narratives and notions of national identity intended to soothe public anxieties in the aftermat.
Other form:Print version: Lowenstein, Adam. Shocking representation. New York : Columbia University Press, ©2005 0231132468 0231132476
Review by Choice Review

Lowenstein (English and film studies, Univ. of Pittsburgh) offers a unique look at the allegorical representations of national trauma in horror films and how these allegories, though not always obvious to the viewer, reflect injustices, disgraces, and societal fears that would otherwise go unaddressed. He pinpoints the impact of WW II, Hiroshima, Vietnam, and 9/11 on the national psyches of France, Britain, Japan, the US, and Canada and convincingly makes the case that certain films--e.g., Eyes without a Face, Peeping Tom, Last House on the Left, and We Were Soldiers--are allegories of the trauma suffered through these tragic historical events. Unfortunately, the text is overloaded with jargon and redundancies, which means not only that it drags in places but also that Lowenstein's unusual perspective on national trauma and horror film gets lost in the shadows of unnecessary repetitiveness and tangled prose. Only those who can slouch through the rhetoric without losing interest stand a chance of benefiting from this book. ^BSumming Up: Optional. Graduate students and researchers. A. F. Winstead Our Lady of the Lake University

Copyright American Library Association, used with permission.
Review by Choice Review