The emergence of standard English /

"In these nine essays Fisher chronicles his gradual realization that Standard English was not a popular evolution at all but was the direct result of political decisions made by the Lancastrian administrations of Henry IV and Henry V - decisions intended to validate their usurpation of the Engl...

Full description

Saved in:
Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Fisher, John H.
Imprint:Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, 1996.
Description:1 online resource (208 pages)
Language:English
Subject:Chaucer, Geoffrey, -- -1400 -- Language.
Chaucer, Geoffrey, -- m. 1400 -- Langue.
Chaucer, Geoffrey, -- -1400.
England. -- Court of Chancery -- History.
Angleterre. -- Court of Chancery -- Histoire.
England. -- Court of Chancery.
English language -- Standardization.
English language -- History.
Language policy -- Great Britain -- History.
Anglais (Langue) -- 1100-1500 (Moyen anglais) -- Normalisation.
Anglais (Langue) -- 1100-1500 (Moyen anglais) -- Histoire.
Anglais (Langue) -- 19e siècle -- Normalisation.
Politique linguistique -- Grande-Bretagne -- Histoire.
Anglais (Langue) -- Normalisation.
FOREIGN LANGUAGE STUDY -- Old & Middle English.
Employees -- Language.
English language.
English language -- Standardization.
Language and languages.
Language policy.
Engels.
Standaardtaal.
Officiële taal.
Great Britain -- History.
Great Britain -- Officials and employees -- Language.
Grande-Bretagne -- Histoire -- 1399-1461 (Maison de Lancastre)
Grande-Bretagne -- Fonctionnaires -- Langue.
Great Britain.
Electronic books.
Electronic books.
History.
Format: E-Resource Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11114071
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:0813171059
9780813171050
0813119359
9780813119359
0813108527
9780813108520
0813148464
9780813148465
Notes:Includes bibliographical references and index.
Restrictions unspecified
Electronic reproduction. [Place of publication not identified] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010.
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002. http://purl.oclc.org/DLF/benchrepro0212
English.
digitized 2010 HathiTrust Digital Library committed to preserve
Print version record.
Summary:"In these nine essays Fisher chronicles his gradual realization that Standard English was not a popular evolution at all but was the direct result of political decisions made by the Lancastrian administrations of Henry IV and Henry V - decisions intended to validate their usurpation of the English throne from Richard II and to create a new sense of nationalism. To achieve this standardization and acceptance of the vernacular, these kings turned to their Chancery scribes, who were responsible for writing and copying legal and royal documents." "Henry IV and V also made special use of authors in their promotion of English as the national language, and Chaucer played a central role in this language planning. None of Chaucer's writings, nor those of any English author, had been copied and circulated before Henry IV's accession in 1399. Once the Lancastrians decided to elevate English to the level of a national language, and thus to replace the French and Latin that had previously been the standard language of government and letters, they looked for appropriate models to disseminate." "Chaucer, a relative of the king and a superb writer in the vernacular, began to be labeled as an ideal master of language, and it was Henry V who inspired the fifteenth-century tradition of citing Chaucer as the "maker" of English. Even more important to linking language development to the government establishment, however, is the fact that Chaucer himself composed in the English of the Chancery scribes."--Jacket.
Other form:Print version: Fisher, John H. Emergence of standard English. Lexington : University Press of Kentucky, 1996 0813119359