Broadcasting and national imagination in post-communist Latvia : defining the nation, defining public television /

This book uses the case study of public television in post-communist Latvia to explore the question of how audiences respond to TV offerings, and how their choices can be seen as an act of agency. Janis Juzefovics builds his book around Albert O. Hirschman's classic concepts of exit, voice, and...

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Bibliographic Details
Author / Creator:Juzefovičs, Jānis, author.
Imprint:Bristol, UK ; Chicago, USA : Intellect, c2017.
Description:164 p. ; 24 cm.
Language:English
Subject:Television viewers -- Latvia -- Attitudes.
Television programs -- Social aspects -- Latvia.
Post-communism -- Social aspects -- Latvia.
Popular culture -- Political aspects -- Latvia.
Manners and customs.
Politics and government.
Popular culture -- Political aspects.
Post-communism -- Social aspects.
Television programs -- Social aspects.
Television viewers -- Attitudes.
Latvia -- Social life and customs -- 1991-
Latvia -- Politics and government -- 1991-
Latvia.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/11031036
Hidden Bibliographic Details
ISBN:9781783206919 (pbk.)
1783206918 (pbk.)
9781783206926 (ePDF)
9781783206933 (ePUB)
Notes:Based on the author's thesis (doctoral)--University of Westminster, 2014, submitted under the title: Defining the nation, defining public television : discourses of publics on public service television in post-communist Latvia.
Includes bibliographical references (p. [145]-156) and index.
Summary:This book uses the case study of public television in post-communist Latvia to explore the question of how audiences respond to TV offerings, and how their choices can be seen as an act of agency. Janis Juzefovics builds his book around Albert O. Hirschman's classic concepts of exit, voice, and loyalty the options available to a person within any system. He uses Hirschman's ideas, along with tools from social constructionism, to assess how the public has responded to the role of public television in the nation-building efforts of the new Latvian state. Along the way, he develops our understanding of public broadcasting more generally, and the way it can be used to define a national "we."