Bibliographic Details

Introduction to the grammar of Jewish Babylonian Aramaic / Elitzur A. Bar-Asher Siegal.

Author / Creator Bar-Asher Siegal, Elitzur A., author.
Edition 2nd, Revised and Extended Edition.
Imprint Münster : Ugarit-Verlag, 2016.
Description 388 pages ; 24 cm.
Language English
Series Lehrbücher orientalischer Sprachen ; III/3
Lehrbücher orientalischer Sprachen. Section III, Aramaic ; 3.
Subject Aramaic language -- Dialects -- Iraq -- Babylonia.
Aramaic language -- Grammar.
Aramaic language -- Dialects.
Aramaic language -- Grammar.
Middle East -- Babylonia.
Format Print, Book
URL for this record http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/10998634
ISBN 9783868351774
3868351779
Notes Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Summary "The dialect spoken and written by the Jews of Babylonia from the third century CE onwards is known as 'Jewish Babylonian Aramaic.' This is the first comprehensive description of this dialect since Levias' 'Grammar of Babylonian Aramaic' of 1930. The current book offers a thorough reexamination of the grammar on the basis of a large corpus in its manuscript witnesses. It not only synthesizes the results of recent scholarship but introduces original insights on many important questions. The book is designed to appeal to readers of all backgrounds, including those with no prior background in Babylonian Aramaic or the Babylonian Talmud. The discussion frequently makes reference to parallels in other Semitic languges and in other Aramaic dialects, as well as to a variety of topics in linguistics. The book is structured as a textbook: it introduces topics in an order determined by pedagogical considerations, and offers vocabulary notes and translation exercises at the end. At the same time, the book can be used as a reference grammar"--

Regenstein, Bookstacks

Loading map link

Call Number: PJ5202.B37 2016

(Browse by Call Number)
Availability:
Holdings details from Regenstein, Bookstacks
c.1 LoanedDue: October 1, 2021 Request via Interlibrary Loan Need help? - Ask a Librarian