Early and late Latin : continuity or change? /

This book addresses the question of whether there are continuities in Latin spanning the period from the early Republic through to the development of the Romance languages. It is often maintained that various usages admitted by early comedy were rejected later by the literary language but continued...

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Bibliographic Details
Imprint:Cambridge, United Kingdom : Cambridge University Press, 2016.
Description:xx, 470 pages ; 24 cm
Language:English
Subject:Latin language, Postclassical -- Grammar, Historical -- Congresses.
Latin language, Preclassical to ca. 100 B.C. -- Grammar, Historical -- Congresses.
Conference papers and proceedings.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/10907176
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Other authors / contributors:Adams, J. N. (James Noel), editor.
Vincent, Nigel, editor.
Knight, Valerie, editor.
ISBN:9781107132252
1107132258
Notes:"The chapters in this volume derive for the most part from papers given at a workshop held at The University of Manchester on 12-13 May 2014 with the title 'Early Latin and late Latin/Romance: continuity and innovation'. Our guiding idea was to explore the traditional view that there are connections between early and late Latin which, so to speak, go underground during the classical period; hence the term 'submerged' Latin which occurs in a number of the chapters that follow."--Preface.
Includes bibliographical references and indexes.
Summary:This book addresses the question of whether there are continuities in Latin spanning the period from the early Republic through to the development of the Romance languages. It is often maintained that various usages admitted by early comedy were rejected later by the literary language but continued in speech, to resurface centuries later in the written record (and Romance). Are certain similarities between early and late Latin all that they seem, or might they be superficial, reflecting different phenomena at different periods? Most of the chapters, on numerous syntactic and other topics and using different methodologies, have a long chronological range. All attempt to identify patterns of change that might undermine any theory of submerged continuity. The patterns found are summarised in a concluding chapter. The volume will appeal to classicists with an interest in any of the different periods of Latin, and also to Romance linguists.