The literary correspondences of the Tonsons /

"This edition presents the literary correspondences of the Tonsons, that is, those letters which shed light on the functioning of their publishing house, the rise of the author, the creation of literature, literary canons, and what Abigail Willilams calls 'Whig literary culture.' It a...

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Bibliographic Details
Edition:First edition.
Imprint:Oxford, United Kingdom : Oxford University Press, 2015.
©2015
Description:xxi, 386 : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
Language:English
Subject:Tonson, Jacob, -- 1656?-1736 -- Correspondence.
Tonson, Jacob, -- 1682-1735 -- Correspondence.
Tonson, Jacob, -- 1656?-1736, -- author, -- addressee.
Tonson, Jacob, -- 1682-1735, -- author, -- addressee.
Tonson, Jacob, -- 1656?-1736.
Tonson, Jacob, -- 1682-1735.
English letters -- History and criticism.
Publishers and publishing -- England -- History -- 18th century -- Correspondence.
English letters.
Publishers and publishing.
England.
English letters.
Business correspondence.
Personal correspondence.
Business correspondence.
Criticism, interpretation, etc.
History.
Personal correspondence.
Records and correspondence.
Format: Print Book
URL for this record:http://pi.lib.uchicago.edu/1001/cat/bib/10488711
Hidden Bibliographic Details
Other authors / contributors:Bernard, Stephen, 1975- editor.
ISBN:9780198700852 (hbk.)
0198700857 (hbk.)
Notes:Correspondence of publishers Jacob Tonson the Elder and Jacob Tonson the Younger with 18th-century literary figures such as John Dryden, Joseph Addison, Alexander Pope, and others.
Includes bibliographical references (pages 323-359) and index.
Summary:"This edition presents the literary correspondences of the Tonsons, that is, those letters which shed light on the functioning of their publishing house, the rise of the author, the creation of literature, literary canons, and what Abigail Willilams calls 'Whig literary culture.' It also provides exemplary letters from Tonson's retirement which shows networks of friendship and patronage at work and which mark significant moment in the lives of the Tonsons. It proves that the study of these individuales, through their own words and those of those with whom they corresponded, is an important witness to their wider agency in political, diplomatic, ecclesiastical, theatrical, musical, architectural, academic, legal, and social history in late Stuart and early Hanoverian England-and in Europe."